JEFF_PRICE_Unique_Mixed_Media_Painting_NEWSPACE_GALLERY_Los_Angeles_LACMA_01_izvs

JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA

JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA

JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
Artist: JEFF PRICE (American, 20th Century). Title: Untitled – 1987. Medium: Unique Mixed Media Painting in watercolor wash and hand-color stone lithograph. Signature: Hand Signed by the Artist in pencil. Edition: Unique Artist Proof. Size: 24 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches (paper). Provenance: Newspace Gallery – Los Angeles. Jeff Price investigates archetypes and fertility symbols in his art. Widely collected, his works can be found in many major collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and The Albuquerque Museum. He’s had numerous solo exhibitions in New York and Los Angeles and has lectured at the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena. Further, he was the recipient of grants from the Paula Krasner Foundation and the Edward Albee Foundation for the Arts.
JEFF PRICE Unique Mixed Media Painting NEWSPACE GALLERY Los Angeles LACMA
1950s_Landscape_La_Puente_Valley_Los_Angeles_California_Painting_Plein_Air_01_wd

1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air

1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air

1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
Hi, making room for new inventory. Original 1950s vintage painting on canvas board, oil or acrylic, some texture and layering to paint, signed Benny Acosta (dated 1958). Lovely original 1950s artwork from La Puente, California, a small town 20 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. The artist’s name and location are written on the back of the board. The painting has a quiet dirt country road beside foothills and fields, a pale blue sky overhead. There is a grove of dense trees on the right side behind a small red house. Wildflowers dot the green landscape. The hills are shades of blue and purple. Cameo canvas board measures 17 7/8″ Width x 13 7/8″ Height. Note: Overall good condition for age with some wear, spots and markings. You have feedback or communication issues. Our store policies and contact info are on front page of our store. Thanks so much for your interest.
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s_Landscape_La_Puente_Valley_Los_Angeles_California_Painting_Plein_Air_01_qmf

1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air

1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air

1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
Hi, making room for new inventory. Original 1950s vintage painting on canvas board, oil or acrylic, some texture and layering to paint, signed Benny Acosta (dated 1958). Lovely original 1950s artwork from La Puente, California, a small town 20 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. The artist’s name and location are written on the back of the board. The painting has a quiet dirt country road beside foothills and fields, a pale blue sky overhead. There is a grove of dense trees on the right side behind a small red house. Wildflowers dot the green landscape. The hills are shades of blue and purple. Cameo canvas board measures 17 7/8″ Width x 13 7/8″ Height. Note: Overall good condition for age with some wear, spots and markings. You have feedback or communication issues. Our store policies and contact info are on front page of our store. Thanks so much for your interest.
1950s Landscape La Puente Valley Los Angeles California Painting Plein Air
Ferdinand_Kaufmann_Ship_Docked_in_the_Los_Angeles_Harbor_Oil_painting_c_1939_01_tjd

Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939

Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939

Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Ferdinand Kaufmann -Boat docked in the San Pedro Harbor-Oil painting-c1920s. Oil painting on canvas board – signed. Frame size 18 1/2 x 16. Board size 13″ x 15 1/2″. Ferdinand Kaufmann was active/lived in California, Pennsylvania / Germany. A landscape and marine painter, Ferdinand Kaufmann was born in Germany and studied in Paris with Jean Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant. Prior to settling in Southern California in 1921, he lived in Pittsburgh where he was a member of the Pittsburgh Art Association. In 1934, he became a resident of Pasadena and exhibited with the Pasadena Art Institute, and in 1939 of Laguna Beach where he was active in the Art Association. He died in 1942 in Los Angeles County. A beautiful piece that will add to your décor!
Ferdinand Kaufmann, Ship Docked in the Los Angeles Harbor Oil painting c. 1939
Antique_Old_Social_Realism_Twins_Portrait_Oil_Painting_Los_Angeles_1931_01_ejoo

Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931

Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931

Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
This is a charming and very well done Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting on artist board, by early Los Angeles, California painter, Walter R. This work depicts two small children, a boy and a girl, who appear to be twins. They are sitting at the edge of a window, where the skyline of old Los Angeles can be seen. The subjects are painted with a mastery for near photorealism that is seldom seen by artists today. Signed and dated in the lower left corner: Walter R. ” Additionally, this piece is annotated on the top edge of the verso: “John Wallace & Joan [illegible] Richards. Approximately 20 1/4 x 22 3/4 inches including frame. Actual artwork is approximately 17 x 19 1/2 inches. Very good condition for nearly a century of age, with some light scuffing and edge wear to the original period gilded frame. There are also some spots of faint scuffing, and light craquelure to the painted surface please see photos. Acquired in Los Angeles County, California. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks!
Antique Old Social Realism Twins Portrait Oil Painting, Los Angeles 1931
Fine_Antique_California_Impressionist_Nautical_Boats_Oil_Painting_HYDE_1930s_01_tc

Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s

Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s

Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
This is a lovely and Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting on canvas, by the talented early 20th century California Impressionist painter, Josephine E. Herron Hyde 1885 – 1965. This artwork depicts a vibrant and jewel-toned harbor scene on Terminal Island, in Long Beach, California. Small white boats are shown idling in the calm turquoise hued waters, while the scaffolding of a wooden dock can be seen in the background. This piece likely dates to the 1930’s – 1940’s. HYDE” in small print in the lower left corner and also signed: “Josephine Hyde in the lower right corner. Additionally, an old, yellowed exhibition label on the verso reads: Mrs. Fishing Boats (Terminal Island)… This small gem is approximately 10 5/8 x 12 3/4 inches including frame. Actual artwork is approximately 15 x 18 inches. Very good condition for age, with some light chipping, wood splitting, and scuffing to the vintage frame please see photos. Acquired from an old collection in Los Angeles, California. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! 1885 – Columbus, Ohio. 1965 – Los Angeles, California. Known for : Painting, crafts, teaching. Herron Hyde (1885 – 1965) was active/lived in California, Ohio. Josephine Hyde is known for Painting, crafts, teaching. Herron Hyde ws born in Columbus, OH on Aug. Hyde studied at Stanford University, and with Nell Walker Warner, Edward Withers, and Will Foster. She was an art teacher in Los Angeles and Long Beach high schools from 1923 until her death in the latter on April 1, 1965. She was the wife of artist Otis Hyde. Art Club; Women Painters of the West; Long Beach AA; Painters of the SW; La Jolla AA. Exh: Pacific-SW Expo (prize); Greek Theater (LA); Ebell Club (LA); LACMA; Pomona Fair; Bowers Museum (Santa Ana). Edan Hughes, author of the book. Who’s Who in American Art 1953-62.
Fine Antique California Impressionist Nautical Boats Oil Painting, HYDE 1930s
SOEY_MILK_White_Anthurium_8_x_10_original_oil_painting_Museum_exhibited_01_dl

SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited

SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited

SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
SOEY MILK “White Anthurium” 8 x 10 inch original oil painting [Museum exhibited]. Painting size: 8 inches by 10 inches. Frame size: 10 inches by 12 inches, with a depth of 1.5 inches. “White Anthurium” by Soey Milk was showcased in the “Risqué {dirty little pictures}” exhibit at the Long Beach Museum of Art in Los Angeles County in September, 2013. The “Risqué” exhibit was curated by Nathan Spoor and Jeff McMillan. The works from the show were displayed on the rich red walls of the museum’s second-floor Kilsby Gallery. All paintings by 40 artists were identical in size: 8 x 10? . The artists included in the museum exhibit were Audrey Kawasaki, David Choe, Ron English, Gretchen Ryan, Eric White, Glenn Barr, Charlie Immer, Esao Andrews, Aron Wiesenfeld, and more. Participants were encouraged to take risks with these works outside of their comfort zones leading to some titillating imagery. Korean artist Soey Milk has captivated the art world with her enchanting illustrations of feminine energy, from meticulously rendered graphite drawings to fantastical oil paintings aflutter with pattern, color and texture. Born in Seoul, Korea in 1989 and currently residing in California, the young artist has amassed a vast following for her work with its mysterious edge and highly refined artistry. Milk has created a compelling new body of figurative paintings and drawings. This painting is really stunning and impactful when seen up close. It’s near impossible to capture the detail in a digital photograph, especially the metallic effect of the incorporated silver leaf. The painting is likely of interest to fans of Lisa Yuskavage, John Currin, David Choe, Audrey Kawasaki, Esao Andrews, James Jean, Mark Ryden, Damien Hirst, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Banksy, Blu, and more. Among the pictures I’ve uploaded here are 1. Completed painting in the studio, 2. On exhibit at the museum, 3. A few closeups taken on January 14th, 2024. Here is a write up from the local newspaper. Long Beach Museum of Art goes’Risqué’ for new exhibit (2013, September 18). Retrieved from Press Telegram. When he first saw one of the original paintings for a new show at the Long Beach Museum of Art, artist and exhibit co-curator Jeff McMillan knew the show would easily live up to its name. Scott Hess was an 8-by-10-inch oil on canvas called Preserving the Natural Order. The piece depicts a female rhinoceros with a pretty bright bow on her tail engaged in a sexual act with a woman in what appears to be a Roman-era arena as a crowd of animals look on. The small painting will probably not appeal to everyone. It will likely shock some people, maybe even offend a few, and it’s definitely a risky piece of art; which is why it fits in well with the museum’s new exhibit titled Risqué {dirty little pictures}. It recently opened at the 2300 E. Venue and runs through Nov. “We want people to question what’s risqué to them, ” said McMillan, a Long Beach resident, on a recent Monday afternoon at the museum a few days before the Sept. The show may challenge you a little bit. I think it’s a very interesting fun show. The exhibit will be displayed on the rich red walls in the museum’s second-floor Kilsby Gallery and will include forty 8-by-10-inch original paintings from 40 different artists including illustrators and fine art painters such as acclaimed painter Gretchen Ryan; Detroit pop surrealist artist Glenn Barr; Soey Milk, an emerging artist known for her erotic surrealist work; and Nathan Spoor, a Burbank-based artist who focuses on surreal paintings. Spoor is also the exhibit co-curator along with McMillan. I expect it to be a dynamic reaction. Some people will enjoy it and some people you hope will be shocked. You want that spectrum. I think this is a show that will cover the polarity of reactions, Spoor said. The collection is intended to offer a look at modern eroticism through the work of artists who were given free range to define what risqué meant to them and to think about what makes something dirty or naughty, said Ron Nelson, executive director of the museum and exhibit creator. “It’s a gutsy move for these artists to be able to put out some of these images, and I think it’s our role as a museum to pique interest, to create conversations and to also be a little bit gutsy, certainly, ” he said. But the exhibit is not for everyone. Nelson said “Risqué” is “rated R” and is open only to adults. There will be museum personnel on hand making sure no minors go into the exhibit, he said. The idea for the show was sparked by Nelson’s visit to the homes of some of his artist friends. He said he always noticed they had small drawings in their homes that they never intended to show in a public setting. Nelson liked the idea of a show with smaller paintings, but he didn’t just want nice doodles, he also wanted to challenge the artists. Each one had to think about what risqué means to them and I’m proud of all of them. I think their work is quite stunning, Nelson said. The painting by Hess is one of the most graphic pieces in the exhibit; others cover the gamut from playful to more subtle erotic images such as Ryan’s piece called David and Amanda. The oil on canvas depicts an attractive blond woman in a revealing dress with bright red lipstick and her mouth slightly open. She’s leaning into a dark shadowy image of a man wearing sunglasses. His left hand is caressing her buttocks. Milk’s painting, which she named “White Anthurium, ” is a little less subtle in its interpretation of risqué. It shows a topless woman wearing a black leather head covering. Her thumb is touching her lower lip as a white substance drips from her mouth. It’s very suggestive without being pornographic, Nelson said. There are also more playful images such as painter Charlie Immer’s Ice Cream Blown. The painting shows one ice cream cone licking another. “What makes me smile about it is how individual artists took their own styles and how they created something that is embodying risqué, ” Nelson said. Some of the artists, I think, took a big chance on that. I think others are more sensual than erotic, but it was the artists line to walk and I respect that completely.
SOEY MILK White Anthurium 8 x 10 original oil painting Museum exhibited
RARE_Prison_SERIAL_KILLER_Outsider_Art_Painting_Letter_Lot_Hadden_Clark_01_pwme

RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark

RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark

RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
This is a seldomly seen and RARE Vintage Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting & Letter Lot, by convicted serial killer, Hadden Clark b. This piece depicts several artworks, including a creepy and finely rendered Valentine letter to the correspondent, featuring Cupids with erect phalluses, two graphite drawings of WNBA basketball players, and a latter artwork on the verso of a letter, featuring two angels embracing. These artworks and letters were acquired from an old filing cabinet in an abandoned storage unit from Los Angeles County, California, with letters that were addressed to Ken Karnig, Joe Hiles, Shane Bugbee, and Sondra London Feel free to look these people up yourself. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! I do not condone the acts of the artis t, but as a degreed Art Historian, I will allow these pieces to be available to the public, who can ultimately decide their relevancy and importance. Hadden Irving Clark (born July 31, 1952). Currently serving two 30-year sentences at. In Westover, Maryland for the murders of 6-year-old Michele Lee Dorr in 1986, and 23-year-old Laura Houghteling in 1992. He was also given a 10-year sentence for robbery after stealing from a former landlord. Clark is the second of four children, and was born and raised in Troy, New York. His brother, Bradfield Clark, strangled a woman in California before eating several body parts. Clark’s parents were both alcoholics and often fought with each other in front of their children. Clark’s mother dressed him in girls’ clothes when drunk and called him “Kristen”. His father eventually committed suicide. As a teenager, Clark tortured and killed animals owned by children who bullied him. Clark trained as a chef and served in the United States Navy until he was discharged after being diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. Over the years, he held a number of menial jobs but was mostly homeless. Clark was arrested multiple times for theft and retaliation. He was arrested for robbery after he vandalized a former landlord’s property and committed several thefts. On May 31, 1986, Clark was ordered by his brother to move out of the latter’s home in Silver Spring. Michele Dorr, a six-year-old friend of his niece, came over looking for her. Clark took Michele to an upstairs room and slashed her throat with a chef knife. Clark then attempted to sexually assault her corpse, drank some of her blood, ate a piece of her flesh, and stuffed her in a duffel bag. He buried her in a park 12 miles away. On October 18, 1992, he killed 23-year-old Laura Houghteling in Bethesda. Clark was working as a gardener for Laura’s mother Penny when she accused Clark of stealing tools from her backyard shed. Clark entered the house through the back door and stabbed Laura to death in her bedroom with a kitchen knife and suffocated her with a pillow. He carried her body in a bedsheet through a wooded area and buried her a half-mile away. He left behind a pillow with his fingerprint as he moved the body. Police soon discovered the bloody pillow and linked the print on it to Clark. Clark confessed and led police to Laura’s body eight months after the murder. Police began looking at him for Dorr’s murder after discovering he lived two houses down from Dorr’s father at the time she disappeared. Police later tested his brother’s old house for blood and found Dorr’s blood in the wooden floorboards of an upstairs bedroom. Clark later led police to her body in January 2000. Clark has confessed to murdering dozens of people starting as a teenager. In 2004, he sent a letter claiming he had killed a then-unidentified woman in Cape Cod. In 1974 known as Lady of the Dunes. Clark explained that he had buried evidence from the crime in his grandfather’s garden and that he knew the woman’s identity but was not going to tell authorities because he claimed they mistreated him. As he has paranoid schizophrenia. Police doubt the accuracy of the confession. The decedent was identified in 2022 as Ruth Marie Terry, who was married at the time of her death to Guy Rockwall Muldavin, who is considered a person of interest in Terry’s death as well as multiple others. Clark led police on December 15, 2000, to his grandparents’ former property where they discovered a plastic bucket with more than 200 pieces of jewelry. Among the items were Laura Houghteling’s high school class ring. He claimed the items were “trophies” he took from his victims. Author Adrian Havill’s. Book Born Evil: A True Story of Cannibalism and Sexual Murder (2001) is a true crime story of Hadden Clark’s crimes. Author Robert Keller’s book True Crime: American Monsters Volume 3: 12 Horrific American Serial Killers (2013) one of the 12 murderers reported on in the book is Hadden Clark. The author focuses on Clark’s cross-dressing cannibalism and his stash of mementos suggesting there are more victims. The Channel 5 (UK). Series Born to Kill. Episode aired: 17 September 2013, reports on Clark’s formative years and their impact on his adult criminal behavior. Network series Evil, I season 5 episode 32, “Dressed to Kill”, aired August 3, 2012, reports on Houghteling’s disappearance and law enforcement suspects the family gardener Clark is responsible. When police search his storage shed they discover evidence tying him to her death. Released multiple crime-documentary episodes from different shows covering the Hadden Clark crimes. Season 7, Episode 25: “Dressed to Kill”, aired March 29, 2003, covers Michele Lee Dorr’s case. Her dad is mentally traumatized by his daughter’s passing and provides detectives with a false confession. However further investigation uncovers evidence leading to the real killer. The series Mugshots episode “Portrait of a Serial Killer: Hadden Clark”, aired June 1, 2002. The true crime and on-the-scene police investigation series Crime Stories episode “Dark Secrets: Hadden Clark”, aired: 2002. The series The Investigators episode “Dark Secrets”, aired: 9 September 2002. Forensic Files – Season 3, Episode 9: “Beaten by a Hair”, aired: November 26, 1998, covers Laura Houghteling’s disappearance. Police find the victim’s hairbrush with 30 hairs, one of which was artificial and did not belong to Laura. The artificial hair, along with other forensic evidence, directly tied Clark to her death. Two-part series on The Last Podcast on the Left. Episodes “Hadden Clark Part I- Mommy’s Basement Bakery” and “Hadden Clark Part II- Women’s Panties”, aired: November 2019.
RARE Prison SERIAL KILLER Outsider Art Painting Letter Lot, Hadden Clark
Local_San_Pedro_Painting_Paseo_Del_Mar_Circa_1990s_Scott_Brown_Angel_s_Gate_01_pq

Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel’s Gate

Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate
Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate
Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate
Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate
Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate

Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate
Offered here is a 14.5″ x 9″ oil painting of Paseo Del Mar from circa 1990s. This painting is interested because it is from a vantage point of where the cliff fell in many years ago, and it depicts the road and houses as they appeared before the road fell in. A small detail in the background is the cliff of Pt Fermin. Unsigned but likely done by local San Pedro artist Scott Brown as this painting is from his studio at Angel’s Gate. Painted on sturdy artist’s board.
Local San Pedro Painting Paseo Del Mar Circa 1990s Scott Brown Angel's Gate
Vintage_Modern_New_York_Constructivism_Abstract_Painting_GEORGE_RODART_1974_01_qcdu

Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974

Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974

Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974
This is a visually striking and Avant-garde RARE Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting, Gouache or Pastels on paper, depicting an abstracted and hard-edged geometric image of intersecting shapes, colors, and texture designs. This artwork is by renowned New York Modernist painter, George Rodart b. 1943, and was acquired directly from the contents of the artist’s former art studio in Los Angeles County, California. Signed and dated in the lower right corner: G. Approximately 18 1/4 x 23 1/4 inches including frame. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! George Rodart (Born 1943) is active/lives in United States. George Rodart is known for Painting. George Rodart was raised in Pasadena California. He initially studied Physics, and later, after working in the computer industry and on the Apollo Project, enrolled at UCLA to study art. Rodart mentored with Richard Diebenkorn and John McCracken, graduating with a MFA. In Los Angeles he exhibited with the Ulrike Kantor gallery. Rodart was included in the Whitney Biennial in 1975 and again in 1983. In 1984 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship in painting. He moved to NYC, entered a relationship, raised a kid and continued his investigations into the nature of painting. He has been painting continuously for fifty years. Rodart’s body of work is exploratory and investigative, an inquiry into how the culture uses the painted image as a vehicle for expression and as a signifier of the cultural moment. Since 2015 his paintings live at the boundary zone between abstraction and representation, in an area of associations dependent on memory, of personal and cultural experiences. His work embraces the meta world of digital experience, moving towards an Abstract Surrealism. My paintings are a visual record of my perceptions and memories at a moment in the present time. They reflect my memories as both an awareness of history and of my transient experience of the present. In the end what I make are just paintings. They are about color and light, about forms and boundaries, about the illusion of space, about traces of my brush’s movement, about their physicality. They are about my vision, about my memory, about my fleeting recognitions, about my associations, about my impressions of past experiences, about my generation’s beliefs and follies, about my life. All these things are arrested in my painted images with the hope they will resonate new memories for another viewer. GEORGE RODART 49 E. 1st Street New York, NY 10003. Born in Los Angeles, California Lives and works in NYC EDUCATION 1972 University of California at Los Angeles, M. 1969 University of California at Los Angeles, B. AWARDS and GRANTS 1983 Guggenheim Fellowship for Painting 1973 Phalen Award for Painting ONE PERSON EXHIBITIONS 1983 Ulrike Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 1982 Ulrike Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 1976 California State University, Los Angeles, CA 1976 Tortue Gallery, Los Angeles, CA BIENNIAL EXHIBITIONS 1983 1983 Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York 1975 1975 Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2103 Fountain Art Fair, Hullaballoo Collective, New York, NY 1990 “The Painter and His Occasion” Curated by Alan Jones, Marta Cevera Gallery, NYC, NY. 1988 “Group Exhibition”, John Davis Gallery, New York, NY. 1992 “Art at Friends” S. Bitter-Larkin Gallery, New York, NY. 1986 “13 Americans”, CDS Gallery, New York, NY. 1984 “A Broad Spectrum”, Design Center, Los Angeles, CA. “Group Exhibition”, Ulrike Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 1983 “Group Exhibition”, Ulrike Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 1982 “Artists Choose Artists”, Selected by R. Diebenkorn, CDS Gallery, New York, NY “Changing Trends-12 Southern California Artists”, Laguna Beach Museum of Art, CA. 1982 “Summer Show”, Carl Borenstein Gallery, Monica, CA “Art and Survival”, Traction Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “Contemporary Triptychs”, Montgomery Gallery, Claremont College, Claremont, CA L. Times”, University Gallery, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA “Contemporary Drawings: In Search of an Image”, University of California at Santa Barbara “California Painting from the Mickey and Ruth Gribin Collection, California State University at Northridge and University of California at Irvine. “Changing Visions”, Margo Levin Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 1981 “Southern California Drawings”, Joseloff Gallery, University of Hartford, Hartford CT. “Variations: Five Los Angeles Painters”, University of Southern California, Los Angeles “Group Exhibition”, Ulrike Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “Drawings”, University Art Gallery, California State University, Dominguez Hills, CA 1978 “Group Exhibition”, Meghan Williams Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “A Painting Show”, Mt. San Antionio College, Walnut, CA. 1977 “Six from California”, Dorothy Rosenthal Gallery, Chicago, IL “Contemporary Masters”, Libra Gallery, Claremont College, Claremont, CA “New Spirits”, Santa Monica College Art Gallery, Santa Monica, CA. 1975 “Group Exhibition”, Tortue Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “Four Artists”, Vanguard Gallery, Fullerton, CA 1974 “Three Los Angeles Painters”, Idaho State University, Boise, ID “Group Exhibition”, Ellie Blankfort Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “Group Exhibition”, Susan Rush Gallery, San Francisco, CA 1973 “Painting 1973″, Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY Kienholz, Lyn, L. 271 Henery, Gerrit, “Artists Choose Artists”, Art News, Oct. 162 Mallinson, Constance, “George Rodart at Ulrike Kantor” Art in America, Oct. 1982 p139 Wortz, Melinda, “The Nation”, Art News, May 1982, p. 135 Gleuck, Grace, “In the Arts: Critics Choices”, The New York Times, 2/21/82 Guide, p. 3 Wilson, William, “Reading Between the Lines”, Los Angeles Times, 2/23/82, Part VI, p. 1 Wilson, William, “Galleries”, Los Angeles Times, Feb 26, 1982, Part VI, p. 11 Knight, Christopher, “Cave Paintings for the Atomic Age” Los Angeles Herald Examiner, Feb 28, 1982, p. RAiR Artist: George Rodart. September 8, 2019. Marshall and Winston Gallery. George Rodart’s exhibition of ten large-scale paintings explore the liminal zone between abstraction and representation. Utilizing accident and free association, he combines simple abstract shapes of cut paper to create larger solid forms which become the central characters of his paintings. In 2016, Rodart completed the first hundred paintings from this series. Then he began planning the next stage, extending his vision into much larger works. Following his move to New Mexico, Rodart’s approach became less traditional, more graphic, and closer to a billboard than a painting. George Rodart was exposed to the arts at a young age, and as a boy took painting classes at the Pasadena Art Museum. He initially studied physics and briefly worked in the computer industry and on the Apollo space project. He received his MFA from UCLA where he studied painting with Richard Diebenkorn. Rodart was included in the 1975 and the 1983 Whitney Biennials. In 1983 he won a Guggenheim award for painting. Spotlight: The evolution of a painter – George Rodart. Roswell Artist-in-Residence George Rodart will have his opening and lecture July 19 at 5:30 p. Followed by a reception at 6 p. In the Marshall and Winston Gallery of the Roswell Museum and Art Center, 1011 N. Rodart’s exhibition of 11 large-scale paintings explore the liminal zone between abstraction and representation. It is always difficult to describe a visual artist with the written word, but in the case of Rodart, it is his background that makes it difficult to choose what to let readers know about the RAiR artist and what to let visitors to his exhibit and lecture learn by themselves. When I visited him in his studio, construction workers were in the midst of doing some repair on his apartment. He said he had adapted to New Mexico by getting up and working on his art at 4 a. And when the heat of summer is at its fiercest, stopping at 2 p. Just as these workers do. Rodart’s studio is in an artistic (dis-)order, with paint lined up in repurposed tubs, paper cutouts laying on a neat pile, canvases lined up and photos of his grandchildren pinned on the wall. He doesn’t sit still, though he is a septuagenarian, he looks decades younger. Only when he finished hanging three of his huge canvases on the wall, he sits down, “Now it looks like an artist lives here, ” he said. I have a funny story. I was showing my work at his 98th birthday party and so he sent me an invitation. Rodart grew up in the midst of the golden age of abstract impressionists and pop art, which would form his future and put in the seed to continuously reinventing himself while staying true to his art. Talking to the artist, it is obvious that he is very open about his passion, life and his artistic media. His ability to share, Rodart said, comes from his family and background, which has a direct connection to New Mexico, though he has lived most of his life in California and New York City. “My father is the son of a musician, they lived just outside of Mexico City, which I have never seen and I probably never will, ” he said. But they came to New Mexico, to a little town on the other side of Albuquerque, called Rodarte. There weren’t a lot of Rodartes in the western hemisphere. My grandfather was Spanish and I have Basque roots. At one point his family moved to California. I grew up in Pasadena, California, in a middle-class neighborhood. We were the first Latinos on the block. I didn’t understand anything about races when I was a boy. My mother sang opera, I studied music. My mother came from Italy when she was only four. There were economic difficulties in Italy, so they sent the children over. She lived with an Irish uncle of all things. He was in the restaurant business. As it is often in first generation families, Rodart’s family spoke only English at home. Rodart said, when he learned about RAiR and about its involvement in art education for the children in town, it struck a personal note. As a young boy, he said his mother took him to the Pasadena Art Museum, only six blocks away from where he lived, and signed him up for painting lessons at age 10. “Fifty years later, I realized I was being taught by fledgeling abstract impressionists, who worked for the museum, ” Rodart said. Because of this museum, I got my exposure to art. Pasadena also had an art faire every year in which I participated as a teenager, but that exposure I had at the age of 10 laid the foundation. From that point on, I developed a fairly elaborate relationship with the museum; I knew all the ladies who worked in there. I wasn’t a member, but they let me in. So I attended the (Marcel) Duchamp retrospective (1963). I didn’t even know who Duchamp was, I was maybe 20 at the time. Rodart’s father had become an engineer and was guiding his son to get into a scientific field, so he studied engineering as well, working for early computer companies and becoming an information technology expert. “I wasn’t good at the technical training, but I was good at drawing, ” Rodart said. I worked for a couple of smaller companies. One of them had me working on a lunar project – I designed a little part that was part of the pack of the man who walked on the moon. So, I had all this technological training and then basically kind of decided,’enough. He was accepted at the University of California Los Angeles where he got his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and then his Master of Fine Arts. At that time, nobody taught marketing or any business aspects connected to the arts, so he started a group to help each other. A lot of us lived in Venice, California at the time. So, we had this little group. We continued the things we did at school. We shared credits of our work; we taught each other how to create a resume and slides. I worked as a carpenter in’75, I was having a hard time to get anybody to pay attention to my work. Rodart moved to New York City. It was rough in’75, but not by’83, unless if you went out to the Bronx. The first time I went to New York City, I stayed with a friend on the floor, typical kind of stuff you did when you were young. We would be walking to East Village and turned around to walk back, it was real creepy. It was still burned out in a lot of places. “I did the art thing for a while, the relocation from California to New York (City) was more difficult than I thought it would be, ” Rodart said. It takes a long time to get used to a new city. The second thing was, I was trying to raise a family, I was into being a responsible father. Rodart withdrew from the exhibition scene, though he continued making art. The majority of art he was creating was investigative and exploring the foundations of painting. While not being active in the art world because of his family, Rodart joined group exhibitions all over the country, including the 1977 Six from California exhibit at the Dorothy Rosenthal Gallery in Chicago, Illinois; in 1981 Southern California Drawings at the Joseloff Gallery, University of Hartford in Hartford, Connecticut; 1982 became a very active year and in 1983, Rodart received the sought-after Guggenheim Fellowship for Painting. From here on, a stable art career kept him in the city. Fast forward to 2015 when a health scare forced Rodart to address his mortality. While other successful artists see their lifetime of work completed at 70, Rodart looked at his work and started to reinvent himself anew. He wanted to reach higher, he said, to start a new style, not to repeat outdated art that no longer had a connection to its purpose. “I imagined myself in this big control room, identifying all this stuff around me, ” Rodart said. I got to thinking, how do we do this? How do we recognize stuff? How do we see things. Rodart became fascinated with the progression of artificial intelligence that shows how the learning process functions. He was also fascinated with cultural aspects on how people literally see art. In 2016, Rodart completed the first 100 paintings from this series. Then he began planning the next stage. Rodart’s style changed from him finding inspiration and finding objects and figures in painting, to using cut-out forms that he arranges and re-arranges until recognition, adding to this, he switched in Roswell from oil paint to acrylics, experimenting during his time as RAiR with different structures. “This would not work with oil, ” he said. Following his move to New Mexico, Rodart’s approach became less traditional, more graphic and closer to a billboard than a painting. This is due to the space he has at the RAiR compound. “This is the biggest and nicest studio I ever had, ” he said. While the paintings he had started in New York City were on a smaller scale, he started creating large collages on canvas that he himself stretched and primed, adding then the cut-outs until he recognizes an object or figure before painting. The results are 11 large pieces of art for the upcoming exhibit. “I didn’t really understand at the beginning what was happening, ” Rodart said. If I think about painting, I think all painting is abstract. Because what you are doing is taking something from the outside world and codifying it on a surface. A photo realist has a high degree of informational content. He makes it conform to a photo. It takes something like Picasso’s “Weeping Woman” painting (which, instead of depicting the Spanish Civil War directly, shows one person suffering). It is one of the most extraordinary paintings ever painted in my opinion. When you look at the painting and don’t see a specific person, but you get this incredible angst, this incredible sadness that comes from the intensity of the image. In-between representation and abstraction, it’s all abstraction, but it is about the degrees of correspondence about the thing you are thinking about on the outside. A photographic image is what we think we see, but we don’t. We know there are other things, like the back (of a person or object). I don’t know exactly, you fill in the image. You don’t worry most of the time, you don’t need to. “The degree of correspondence varies all along, and for me, there is a place in the middle, ” Rodart said. If you find something literal, I do that, but that is something that just happens, I let the work happen. These things are very concrete. These subjective views fascinate Rodart and where those views come from, it can be cultural or come from life experience. Rodart, however, does want the onlooker to find their own view of his art, that’s why he rarely gives his work titles, but rather numbers to identify and to catalogue. Painting has a long history and my recent interest has to do with what I discovered about how we attribute meaning to things, how we attribute recognition, and I use the word’association’ a lot when I talk about these things. I make something until I have some kind of association with it, it kind of looks like a figure. I have a lot of things where I play around with some shape. The public has until Sept. 8 to see Rodart’s exhibit. He hopes and wishes to remain in Roswell, feeling an affinity with the open landscape, which is so different to the skyscrapers of New York City. His staying, however, will depend on the success of his plans to bring more attention to Roswell’s art scene and its possibilities. “The thing is, they should never underestimate the importance of having the two museums, the miniature museum and the music events, ” Rodart said. Those cultural things are a huge draw to relocating businesses. It’s pretty extraordinary and a pretty extraordinary place.
Vintage Modern New York Constructivism Abstract Painting GEORGE RODART 1974