Roy_Lichtenstein_Los_Angeles_Original_Vintage_Poster_01_ank

Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster

Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster

Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Year 1987 Poster Size 38.4 x 25.5/ 97.5 x 64.8cm Rolled/Folded/Other Rolled Art By Roy Lichtenstein Condition Mint Condition Notes None – item is in mint condition Original limited poster from the 1987 Roy Lichtenstein retrospective exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. This beautiful and rare poster features the Pop Art legends piece from the same year “Cold Shoulder”. This beautiful piece is on heavy art supply cartridge paper, and the colours are extremely bright and vivid. The piece is in fantastic mint condition, and looks perfect framed. Framing Options Framed posters come with a timeless made to measure custom frame available in black, white or natural oak colour. Each frame is made from high quality solid oak and the artwork is framed with a surrounding white mount to make the poster stand out even more. The frame size is the size of the poster plus an additional 70mm on each side. Frames are packaged and securely padded in a purpose built reinforced cardboard box. Unframed posters are packaged and securely padded in a purpose built reinforced cardboard tube.
Roy Lichtenstein Los Angeles Original Vintage Poster
Gary_Miltimore_Original_Air_Catalina_Travel_Poster_01_ref

Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster

Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster

Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
Poster is an advertisement for Catalina airlines, which serviced travel to the famous island off the coast of southern California. This piece depicts Avalon bay, the island’s beautiful entrance. The bay is right next to the equally legendary Catalina Casino, known for its red rotunda. Catalina has consistently been one of the most beautiful and visited travel destinations in southern California and is known for not only these landmarks, but also for its rich history, wildlife, and location. Subject American, Aviation, Modern, Travel. Size: Medium: 17 1/4 x 23 1/4 in. /43.8 x 59 cm. Condition: A – Amazing Condition- no Fading no discoloration- No paper loss. Air Catalina carried Southern Californian jet setters to the idyllic getaways of Long Beach, San Pedro, and Catalina. Miltimore captures the picturesque beauty of Catalina’s Avalon Bay-the entry point to Los Angeles County’s southernmost city. The island, sits off the coast of LA – Long Beach and the South Bay- only 30 miles off the California mainland. Developed by William Wrigley, Jr. (of chewing gum fame) in 1919. He also established the landmark Catalina Casino, which is the red-roofed rotunda seen here. The island is now an immensely popular tourist destination, but it was also home to a very young Marilyn Monroe, who lived here briefly with her first husband, James Dougherty.
Gary Miltimore Original Air Catalina Travel Poster
RARE_Historic_Vintage_Martin_Luther_King_Day_Poster_Los_Angeles_BOB_FITCH_01_yeq

RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH

RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH

RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
This is a significant and RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Jr. Day Poster, created in the early 1980’s to honor the recognition of Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a holiday in the State of California. Governor Jerry Brown signed this holiday into State Law in California on September 3rd, 1981. This piece was produced by the Los Angeles County Schools Board of Education, utilizing an original photograph of Dr. King by acclaimed American Civil Rights photographer and activist, Bob Fitch 1939 – 2016. King is represented in a stoic and contemplative stance, with several small children of various racial ethnicities and cultural backgrounds in his arms. This poster reads: Martin Luther King, Jr. The California legislature has designated January 15, birthdate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As an official State holiday… I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality, and freedom for their spirits. ” Additionally, this piece is typographically signed: “Bob Fitch” at the lower right edge and reads: “Office of the Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools, ” and bears a small seal which reads: “Los Angeles County Schools Board of Education. Approximately 21 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches including frame. Actual artwork is approximately 18 x 24 inches. Very good condition for age, with some light creasing and speckles of soiling under the glass, and mild scratches and edge wear to the vintage wooden frame. This historic poster is exceedingly scarce, as I cannot find another example anywhere, after scouring the Internet extensively. This piece would be an important addition to any museum archival collection, American Civil Rights memorabilia collection, or a collector of Bob Fitch’s impressive photographic work. Acquired in Los Angeles County, California. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr. But later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. Degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston he met and married Coretta Scott, a young woman of uncommon intellectual and artistic attainments. Two sons and two daughters were born into the family. In 1954, Martin Luther King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights for members of his race, King was, by this time, a member of the executive committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the leading organization of its kind in the nation. He was ready, then, early in December, 1955, to accept the leadership of the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott described by Gunnar Jahn in his presentation speech in honor of the laureate. The boycott lasted 382 days. On December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court of the United States had declared unconstitutional the laws requiring segregation on buses, Negroes and whites rode the buses as equals. During these days of boycott, King was arrested, his home was bombed, he was subjected to personal abuse, but at the same time he emerged as a Negro leader of the first rank. In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization formed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. The ideals for this organization he took from Christianity; its operational techniques from Gandhi. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. In these years, he led a massive protest in Birmingham, Alabama, that caught the attention of the entire world, providing what he called a coalition of conscience. And inspiring his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, a manifesto of the Negro revolution; he planned the drives in Alabama for the registration of Negroes as voters; he directed the peaceful march on Washington, D. Of 250,000 people to whom he delivered his address, “l Have a Dream”, he conferred with President John F. Kennedy and campaigned for President Lyndon B. Johnson; he was arrested upwards of twenty times and assaulted at least four times; he was awarded five honorary degrees; was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure. At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr. Was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated. Robert De Witt Fitch. Robert De Witt Fitch was born on July 20, 1939, in Los Angeles. His parents were Robert Fitch and Marion Weeks De Witt. His father was a minister with the United Church of Christ. And professor of Christian ethics. Fitch went to high school in Berkeley. In 1961, Fitch earned a B. At Lewis & Clark College. Fitch later earned both a B. And a Master of Divinity. At the Pacific School of Religion. His father was dean. Of the Pacific School of Religion. In 1965, Fitch was ordained. By the United Church of Christ. Early in his career, Fitch served as an intern at Glide Memorial United Methodist Church. There he worked with groups including street gangs, the homeless, hippies and LGBT. Fitch was later a labor organizer. And a draft resistance. Fitch worked at the California. Department of Housing and Community Development. And at the Resource Center for Nonviolence. Fitch died on April 29, 2016, in Watsonville, California. He was aged 76 and died from complications of Parkinson’s disease. An archive of Fitch’s photos is held at Stanford University Libraries. The archive is described as containing over 200,000 images, primarily black and white photographs and negatives, spanning the period from 1965 to the present. From Watsonville, California, the activist photographer Bob Fitch was best known for his work that captured iconic images of major figures of movements for civil rights, peace and social justice, such as Dr. Bob Fitch has written: My life has been immeasurably enriched by the people whose lives I have been privileged to document, especially the workers and leaders of this nation’s non-violent campaigns for peace & justice. Bob Fitch: Leading Social Movement Photojournalist. Bob Fitch was a leading social movement photojournalist. His photographs were used to promote civil rights, labor rights, and war resistance movements. Bob Fitch devoted his life to community organizing for multiracial democracy after reading James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time. Bob Fitch worked and lived at the Resource Center for Nonviolence from 1999 to 2006, and lived in Watsonville from 2006 until his death in 2016. In 1965 Fitch was invited by Hosea Williams to be a staff photographer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) during the civil rights movement. “I was told, Bob, we can’t send African-American journalists and photographers into the field’cause they’ll get beat up and killed,'” Fitch recalled in an interview; Every week you’ll come back with a news story in print and photos, and you’ll send them to the major Black print media around the nation. Fitch photographed voter registration, voting, and recruitment and training for African-American political candidates during the first election following the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. He documented everyday lives of African-Americans, and marches, demonstrations, meetings during SCLC’s organizing efforts in Chicago, People-to-People tours in Alabama, the Meredith Mississippi March Against Fear, and the Citizenship Education Program in Alabama by Septima Clark and Dorothy Cotton. Clayborne Carson, Stanford University movement historian, recalled that Fitch was so trusted even in unguarded moments that he was the only white person present at an emotional meeting among Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael and other civil rights figures in Greenwood, Miss. In 1966, the night before Mr. Carmichael recast the movement by invoking the slogan Black Power. Summoned to Atlanta in 1968 by Dr. King’s widow, Coretta Scott King, to cover her husband’s funeral, Mr. Fitch debated whether to photograph the open coffin. It was a tough decision to take that photo. It felt like blasphemy to put a camera in his face. But then I thought,’The world needs to see this horrible truth. After the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Fitch decided to document other movements making history. He photographed Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, farm workers striking in fields, and the founding convention of the United Farm Workers Union. Fitch photographed Dorothy Day of the Catholic Workers movement, Catholic war resisters Daniel Berrigan and Philip Berrigan, activist singer Joan Baez, draft resister David Harris, Black Member of Congress Ron Dellums and Pajaro Valley political leader Luis Alejo. His work is presented in. My Eyes Have Seen. 1971, Richard Steven Street’s. Photographing Farmworkers in California. This Light of Ours: Activist Photographers of the Civil Rights Movement. During his tenure at RCNV, Bob continued his photojournalism by documenting local peace & justice actions and projects in Vietnam (Friendship Village), Brazil (alcohol fuel), Sri Lanka (International Peaceforce), Palestine, Watsonville, UCSC, and the 2006 Guerrero Azteca Tijuana-to-San Francisco march with Fernando Suarez del Solar, Camilo Mejia and Pablo Paredes. In his photography he emphasized the role of the rank and file as agents for social change and he was propelled by a desire to not just observe movements but to be deeply involved in them. He set up RCNV’s website, streamlined and perfected RCNV’s outreach and media connections. Bob lived upstairs at the Resource Center’s Broadway house for several years and served as the unofficial on-site host and chief mischief maker. He was a mentor to countless young people. He had an organizing principle for young activists who sought RCNV support: bring 4 people committed to working for your organizing goal for at least a year, and we will support you. He was active in RCNV’s GI Rights Hotline, counseling troops and young people about alternatives to the military. He was instrumental in bringing the Santa Cruz City Schools Opt-In program to high schools, so that students had to request to be contacted by military recruiters instead of school districts giving student contact information to recruiters. This program was replicated nationwide. Bob played a lead role for RCNV in organizing efforts including the Santa Cruz Living Wage Coalition; the Million Mom March; the Santa Cruz Peace Coalition responding to the 1992 Iraq war, and events featuring Black Member of Congress Ron Dellums and his successor, Barbara Lee. The Bob Fitch Photography Archive is curated by Stanford Libraries Archive and is accessible to all of us. The archive contains over 200,000 images, primarily black and white photographs and negatives, spanning the period from 1965 to 2012. Bob Fitch insisted that as a condition of Stanford receiving the images, people and nonprofit organizations may download high quality image files and reproduce his photos for free. Go online to the Stanford Libraries Bob Fitch Photography Archive. In 1966, a white civil rights worker was thrown in jail in a rural Alabama town. To his surprise and enlightenment, he was bailed out by local citizens – three African-American families used their farms as security for his bail! That worker was me. Those committed and generous farm families, and other working families like them, are my heroes, my role models. The farmers and their families were not Civil Rights movement all-stars. They were not featured and profiled in the daily papers and on TV. Nevertheless, they were the source and sustenance of the Black Civil Rights movement. Successful organizing requires shrewd tacticians, articulate spokes-people and focused workers. But I also know from study and experience that successful social struggle requires the participation and support of the people who live that struggle in their daily learning, job, family and community. Trained to be a Protestant minister. Career as a photojournalist began in 1965 when he joined the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. S organization, The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, as a staff photographer. As Fitch notes, I worked for two intense years as the volunteer photographer for Dr. King and the SCLC, crisscrossing “Black Belt” states to document his people-to-people speaking tours promoting get-out-the-vote campaigns. Fitch’s work with the SCLC in 1965 and 1966 produced powerful images of Dr. King’s speaking and leadership, as well as of the courageous efforts of marchers in events such as the 1966 Meredith March Against Fear.
RARE Historic Vintage Martin Luther King Day Poster, Los Angeles BOB FITCH
Shogun_The_Shogun_Age_Exhibition_LA_County_Museum_of_Art_Poster_15_x_32_01_sts

Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32

Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32
Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32
Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32
Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32

Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32
Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition Los Angeles County Museum of Art Poster (December 17, 1983 – February 26, 1984) from The Tokugawa Art Museum. Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition Los Angeles County Museum of Art Poster (December 17, 1983 – February 26, 1984) from The Tokugawa Art Museum, Framed. It is in very good condition-Please see photos for the details. Measures 15″ x 32″, 6.5 Lbs Weight. If you have any questions, Please let us know.
Shogun The Shogun Age Exhibition LA County Museum of Art Poster, 15 x 32
RARE_Vintage_David_Hockney_Modern_LACMA_Exhibition_Lithograph_Poster_1988_01_gq

RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988

RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988

RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
This is an exceptional and RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, from the Retrospective of David Hockney’s repertoire at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1988. This work reads: DAVID HOCKNEY… Los Angeles County Museum of Art February 4 – April 24, 1988… ” Small fine print at the lower edge of this print reads: “David Hockney (born England 1937, active in the United States), A Walk around the Hotel Courtyard Acatlan (1985), oil on two canvases, 72 x 240 in. Photograph by Stephen Sloman. Design by Sandy Bell. David Hockney: A Retrospective was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. This exhibition is made possible by AT&T. Approximately 18 1/4 x 40 inches including frame. Actual artwork is approximately 18 x 39 1/2 inches. Very good condition for age, with moderate edge wear and paint loss to the original period frame please see photos. Acquired in Los Angeles County, California. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! DAVID HOCKNEY- 1988 “LACMA: A Walk Around The Hotel Courtyard, Acatlan”. This 1988 LACMA exhibition was remembered for the wildly successful opening party on Feb. 3, 1988, when over 3000 people showed up. Throngs of hundreds waited outside and down the street. Many were high dollar LACMA contributors and still getting in wasn’t easy. David Hockney painted “A Walk Around the Hotel Courtyard, Acatlán”. In 1985 after discovering a hotel courtyard in Mexico, when car trouble forced him to stop on the way while driving to Mexico City. The painting is one of his more hotly colored works, being mostly red, with green and yellow, and is done in reverse perspective. In the painting the detail of the columns is gone, the painter has vanished, but the viewer is presented with a space where distance is abolished. There is cubism, “scientific” objectivity is gone, and plurality of space is emphasized. Reverse perspective is used to produce an all-seeing experience leading to a visionary feeling. Like a frame around paintings which decorate an altar, it seems to amalgamate real space with the world of the miracle. The original oil on two canvases or a “diptych” measure 183×610 centimeters overall. It is owned by the Benesse Corporation and is currently on display at Benesse House and Art Site, a contemporary art museum and hotel at the art village of Noashima, Japan. Bradford College of Art, Royal College of Art, London. Known for his photo collages and paintings of Los Angeles swimming pools, David Hockney is considered one of the most influential British artists of the 20th century. In fact, in a 2011 poll of more than 1,000 British artists, Hockney was voted the most influential British artist of all time. For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. This major retrospective-the exhibition’s only North American venue-honors the artist in his 80th year by presenting his most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present. Working in a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence, Hockney has examined, probed, and questioned how to capture the perceived world of movement, space, and time in two dimensions. The exhibition offers a grand overview of the artist’s achievements across all media, including painting, drawing, photography, and video. From his early experiments with modernist abstraction and mid-career experiments with illusion and realism, to his most recent, jewel-toned landscapes, Hockney has consistently explored the nature of perception and representation with both intellectual rigor and sheer delight in the act of looking. David Hockney British, b. 1937 has produced some of the most vividly recognizable and influential works of the twentieth century. Hockney gained notoriety in his mid-twenties, after receiving the Gold Medal from London’s Royal College of Art, and he quickly became one of the defining figures of the British Pop Art movement. In the late 1960s Hockney relocated to California and established himself as a prolific figurative and landscape artist. He is perhaps best recognized for the works he produced there: brightly colored, large-scale evocative images of the Southern California lifestyle, and domestic, intimate portraits of his friends, family, and lovers. Hockney’s works are notable for their quietness of subject, flatness of space, and subtle reduction of form. Throughout his career he has worked in a wide variety of media, including painting, drawing, collage, photography, and printmaking, often utilizing contemporary technologies, including fax machines, laser photocopiers, and other 20th- and 21st-century digital instruments. Hockney has received a vast number of awards and honors, including the First Annual Award of Achievement from the Archives of American Art, Los Angeles; membership to the Board of Trustees of the American Associates of the Royal Academy Trust, New York; Distinguished Honoree of the National Arts Association, Los Angeles; the Lorenzo de Medici Lifetime Career Award of the Florence Biennale; and nine honorary degrees from institutions worldwide. In 1997, he was made a Companion of Honour from the British and Commonwealth Order for his outstanding achievement in the arts. David Hockney’s work can be found in numerous distinguished public collections around the world, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the Art Institute of Chicago; the National Portrait Gallery, London; The Tate Gallery, London; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; the Museum of Modern Art, Vienna; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D. And the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D. He currently lives and works in Normandy, France.
RARE Vintage David Hockney Modern LACMA Exhibition Lithograph Poster, 1988
Georgia_O_Keeffe_Los_Angeles_County_Museum_Of_Art_1989_Exhibition_Poster_01_kvv

Georgia O’Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster

Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster

Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
Georgia O’Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art Exhibition Poster Cardboard. Has some small staining at top on the rim of the poster but not on the main part of the poster if framed will easily cover it. Overall condition I’d say in excellent. If you have any questions please let me know thanks : Heather. (Was framed but unfortunately the glass broke).
Georgia O'Keeffe Los Angeles County Museum Of Art 1989 Exhibition Poster
RARE_Vintage_Chicano_Mexican_Art_Exhibition_Poster_Roberto_Gutierrez_SIGNED_01_dz

RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED

RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED

RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
This is a culturally important and Very RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, titled East Los Angeles, by esteemed Southern California Chicano artist Roberto Gutierrez b. This artwork depicts a bustling cityscape scene in East Los Angeles, with signs for Gage Ave. And Cesar Chavez Blvd. Visible in the distance. This artwork depicts a rain slicked road at sunset, with numerous vehicles passing through the center of the scene. Off to the sides, a paletero man, a small church service, and Latino families can be seen walking along the sidewalks. Hand signed and dated by the artist at the lower right edge: Roberto Gutierrez 95. Approximately 27 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches including frame. Actual visible artwork is approximately 19 1/4 x 27 1/4 inches. Good condition for age, with some light scuffing and paint loss to the original period frame please see photos. This particular variant of Gutierrez’ poster has never been offered for sale before, and when these pieces do come on the market, they are never hand signed by the artist. Original artworks by Roberto Gutierrez are prominently displayed in the permanent collections of the Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art and Culture of the Riverside Art Museum and held in many public and private art collections worldwide. Acquired in Los Angeles County, California. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! Chicano artist Roberto Gutiérrez is one of the most important artists to come out of the East Los Angeles artistic boom of the early 1970s. However, he has been largely ignored. This essay explores Gutiérrez’s life and the significance of his work to the evolving Chicana/o artistic narrative about Latino life and aesthetics in Los Angeles. In particular, it explores the way in which Gutiérrez’s oeuvre reflects and creates an image of urban Los Angeles that is distinctly Latino and working-class. The Avenue Studio proudly presents Roberto Gutierrez – Paintings. Roberto Gutierrez, painting for over 30 years, is one of the more important artists to come out of East Los Angeles. His inspiration comes from the gritty streets where daily he walks, and the coffee houses and bookstores he frequents. Roberto sketches incessantly all he observes which later becomes an acrylic or gouache painting. This current body of work exhibited represents a small but significant cross-section of Gutierrez’s historical record, including his Paris series. His work has been widely shown in galleries throughout the Southwest. Many of his paintings have been the possession of former Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Roberto Gutiérrez: Vietnam Veteran, Chicano Artist Capturing the Colors of Life. His life’s journey — walking through the bloodied soils of Vietnam, through the halls of East Los Angeles College, up and down the marbled floors of the finest museums in Europe, and retracing the steps of his artistic heroes in Montmartre, France – all have influenced him to become the renown painter he is today: incapsulating landmarks, streets. Everyday people, capturing imagery of colors and shapes that transition from realism to impressionism to abstract. Roberto Gutiérrez left Los Angeles in 1961 as a naïve 17-year old figuring the U. Marines was a great way to escape his difficult childhood. And, he guessed, it was a way to get an education and improve his future potential – at what? Well, here he was clueless. Robert “Bob” Gutiérrez, U. Marine Corps, having served and survived the horrors of Vietnam without ever discovering what he would do for the rest of his life. Thankfully, Gutiérrez did eventually find his life calling. Today, Chicano Studies scholars rate him as one of the most important Chicano artists to come out of the Los Angeles 1970s’ boom. Gutiérrez, now 73, is the first to admit that he is an emotional painter. It could be a traumatic childhood or Vietnam memory that might dictate if he uses thick black paint with wide abstract strokes, like the ones he used for his recent 6th Street Bridge collection. The bold black represents the great sadness that this iconic L. Landmark that connected the east to west has a date with a wrecking ball. “This bridge was a big deal back when Los Angeles was a younger city, ” recalled Gutiérrez. He walked across it dozens of times from childhood to the present. Witnessing the bridge as a newbie to now seeing it’s demise, breaks my heart. This collection represents the metaphor for life. You’re born, you go through life and then you die. That’s how this collection’s images came to life. There are also paintings that represent more playful emotions, street scenes filled with color and images of his gente (people), living mundane days with unshakable faith and hope-images associated with a Latino community. Gutiérrez’s work has evolved from looking more like photographs to instead challenging his imagination by capturing the strong feelings rather than the literal image. And then there is his breathtaking 2013 Paris collection. Images seize the positive of our neighborhoods and landscapes, his Paris collection morphs the spirits of painters: figurative impressionist Édouard Manet, post-impressionist Vincent van Gogh, landscape impressionist Claude Monet and expressionist Chaim Soutine. “Paris does something to me, ” Gutiérrez said. When I see a particular sight in Paris, I just run with it. I run with my feelings. One painting may look like an impressionist painting and another one may impress me differently and remind me of Soutine, whose paintings depending on his mood may look a little like he might have been on acid when he painted it. I just go with it. Paris brought out the best of my figurative impressionist paintings. But as I’ve gotten older, I’ve evolved more into abstract images. “I believe my new European collection will be more abstract, but we’ll see what comes out of me, ” Gutiérrez said. I may start it one way but the ultimate result is unknown to me until I’m done. That’s what painting with your emotions does to you. I’m very excited to be returning to Paris. Eating at one of his favorite Italian restaurants recently, he was asked if he had retired. “There is no such thing as retirement for poor people, ” he chuckled with the same youthful sparkle in his eyes. Gutiérrez continues to paint and teach a mixed-media art class at Plaza de La Raza in Lincoln Heights. Gutiérrez is currently also part of the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) new exhibition “Somewhere Over El Arco Iris: Chicano Landscapes, 1971 to 2015, ” which runs through Nov. MOLAA is open Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 11 a. M to 5 p. Friday from 11 a. Admission is free only on Sunday. This Veterans Day, Lance Cpl. Robert “Bob” Gutiérrez will pay tribute to several memorial ceremonies throughout the city of Los Angeles. But he will never, ever discuss his Vietnam experience – these emotions are revealed only in his paintings. Yet you know it is important because the few hanging photos in his home are of his buddies, many whom never made it back. Roberto Gutiérrez: The Alchemy of Magical Brushstrokes and Metropolitan Landscapes. Artist and studio painter Roberto Gutiérrez isn’t pulling any punches these days. In fact, it wouldn’t be an overstatement to say the native son of L. S Eastside is coming up aces more often than not. And when he isn’t walking away from his latest self-imposed challenge with a resounding victory, he’s holding his own with a combination of skill, panache and charisma that forces a split decision in his favor. And with the title belt all but his, he’s primed and ready to face off once more with a few of the most important metropolitan centers in the world. Increasingly revered as master of the urban landscape-rich and distinctly enunciated personal panoramas from “el mundo Gutierrezano”(the Gutierrezian world)-he remains an artist beyond the pale. A recent solo exhibition at the edge of a small, unlikely lake in the Los Angeles Lincoln Heights district is the most emphatic affirmation yet of a simple, unspoken truth: Roberto Gutiérrez is the most important Chicano artist you’ve never heard of. And that isn’t his problem. It isn’t my problem. Roberto Gutiérrez: The Evolution of a Contemporary Artist-Magical Brushstrokes of Metropolitan Landscapes. The spry, paintbrush and graphite-wielding septuagenarian waltzes out of the hometown corner with welterweight grace. Reared in the somewhat hard-knock but still irrepressibly noble barrios of Los Angeles, he offers up, as an unblemished score card, the record of his date with the foremost metropolis in the nation. The unanimously riveting visual diary-worthy of a Madison Square Garden spectacle-brims with the streets, the pedestrian pathways, the built environments and the natural landscapes of Manhattan. Deftly curated by Gabriel Jiménez at the Plaza de la Raza Boathouse Gallery in Lincoln Park, the selection of paintings and works on paper-inspired by the Eastside enclaves he came of age in, his twin pilgrimages to Paris, L. S late Sixth Street Bridge, and, ultimately, even Gotham itself-bristle with big-city light and luster. They also echo and twist with the indelible love and loss that make borders, city limits and nation-state boundaries meaningless. Rendered by the artist in acrylic on canvas, graphite on paper or with various ink, gouache, and tie-dye combinations, the factories, museums and office towers we recognize from a familiar Manhattan skyline hum and resonate as much with the humanity of the crowds passing through them daily as they do with historical or architectural significance. Executed over the last three years, the results of his affair with Hong Kong on the Hudson are a fitting finale to the three-part survey of a career that merits serious study and examination. (Gouache, Sumi Ink and Tie-dye) and. Central Park in the Winter. (Acrylic on Canvas) are no more or no less sacred than the. (Sumi Ink and Tie-dye) or a. Water Tower in Manhattan. (Sumi Ink and Tie-dye). From the serenity of a snow-riddled Central Park scene to the obscure beauty of. Little Brazil & 46th Street. What becomes most clear in the crowning segment of this highly anticipated evolutionary assessment-is that Gutiérrez, the artist, is at home anywhere. “Of course I was always Chicano, but before any of that, I was just another one of those [Mexican] street urchins, ” Gutiérrez says. As a kid, I used to walk downtown to shine shoes, and I thought I’d hit the big time when I could charge ten cents instead of a nickel. If hunger and hardship at home shaped his childhood during the 1940s and’50s in Chinatown, Boyle Heights and East L. Combat in Vietnam as a U. Marine reinforced the futility of dreams and aspirations. Enlisting at 17, he was guaranteed “three squares a day” and found purpose in the regimen of military routine. That illusion evaporated, he confesses, during a mental breakdown leading to his discharge. “When I got out of the military, I took a drawing class at East LA College, and realized I couldn’t draw, ” he says. Turning to abstract art, he nonetheless favored, he recounts, the “Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and Fauvists” until he was confronted, berated and cajoled by legendary Self Help Graphics founder Sister Karen Boccalero. “She insisted I make figurative work, ” Gutiérrez recalls. And she encouraged me to come home in my art. Was scheduled to close in January but extended to accommodate more gallery traffic than usual. According to Brenda Herrera, principal at a PR firm representing him, Gutiérrez taught art at Plaza de la Raza for over 20-years. “He retired two years ago, but everybody remembers him, ” Herrera says. With curatorial authenticity derived from a familiarity with and the inclusion of several important early works, the exhibition is pays heed to the artist’s deliberate use, during that formative period, of heavy lines and a slightly skewed perspective. The dark outlining of both human figures and inanimate subjects imbues them with a playful defiance. (Acrylic on Canvas), centered on a Little Tokyo landmark, the storefronts, asphalt and pavement are living, breathing repositories of a community’s history and heart. Their innate cultural validity-agency, alluded to in the saturated color, opposes erasure or relegation to phantom invisibility. Paintings such as C. Ity Terrace, Eagle Street and City Terrace Drive. Provide a similar refrain, albeit in less commercial, primarily residential corridors of historic East L. These earlier works, foreshadow the more painterly concerns evident in the second suite of works installed in the middle section of the gallery. Gestated during a pair of trips to the French capital, two pieces here. (Acrylic on Canvas) and. Last Light Ile de la Cite. (Black & White) evoke a style I’ve described elsewhere as architectural abstractionism. ” Both depict austere and haunting spaces in working-class Parisian “arrondissements. There, Gutiérrez retraced the Montemarte meanderings of Van Gogh, Cezanne and Gaugin, artists who broke from Impressionism and rejected schools of impersonal realism or representational. In this context, it is worth noting that a number of the Paris-inspired works feature old-world architectural elements-windows, street lamps and staircases-that verge on form-based abstraction but nonetheless invoke emotional depth and vulnerability. Wild Ride on 6th Street Bridge. (Acrylic on Canvas) delivers an intensely visceral flood of foreboding, despite a limited palette. While ostensibly figurative, the painting seems intentionally fraught with a dangerously irreverent eagerness to dance lasciviously with a less than latent abstract expressionism. The subject of the painting, a car careening out of control atop the bridge, is symbolic. One false note, a single misstep, an unintended line or an accidental brushstroke from the hand responsible for. Is all that this recalcitrant abstraction needs to send the car over the edge, usurp the narrative and subvert the otherwise civilized Gutiérrez send off in honor the iconic bridge he was sorry to see destroyed. By contrast, series of smaller gray-scale paintings depicting concrete and steel bridge details from the demolished steel girder structure-intentionally hung in an abstract pyramid pattern-is collectively rife with a forlorn sadness that coexists with each painting’s geometrically abstract, detached reference to the lost viaduct. Culled from a specific series called. Elegy to the 6th Street Bridge. Which debuted at Ave. 50 Studios, Gutiérrez says, they were the result out of a dark pall that descended upon him after a return from the second excursion to Paris and the successful opening of a likewise gray-tinted collection inspired by the 1930s and’40s noir legacy in Los Angeles. I felt like it was time to come home. I was ready, Gutiérrez says, referring to the genesis of the aforementioned exhibition of work based on L. That was really how the. The wrecking ball that not long ago annihilated the bridge which had loomed so heavily over his past and in his imagination was simply a reminder that even monumental cement and steel wonders, like celluloid archives, are ephemeral vanities at best. For Gutiérrez, who has courageously painted his way through murkier and bloodier terrain before, there remained one more distant prize on the horizon, one that harkened back to his boyhood walks along Broadway at the height of an era when movie palaces-the Million Dollar Theater and The Orpheum, for example-glittered nightly with neon. First run films, red carpet premieres and Hollywood stars were frequent fixtures in and around L. S original Broadway Theater District then. Because it was Broadway, you automatically thought of New York. Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, says Gutiérrez. He credits Gabriel Jiménez and Plaza de la Raza Executive Director María Jiménez for their belief in the viability of an exhibition based on the evolution of his work over time. His late bloomer travel opportunities, he exclaims, have all been dreams come true. “Everyone was getting ready for Christmas, ” he says about his inevitable beeline to the oft-cited center of the art world. We rode around Central Park in a horse-drawn carriage. So, yes, I feel very lucky, says Gutiérrez. His genuine excitement and joy are effusive. They are occasioned by the tangible reflection of his aesthetic trajectory over the last several decades gathered in a formidable retrospective. Grouped together as one “suite” in a semi-enclosed space to the immediate left of the gallery entrance, the East L. Landscapes and a few of the bridge works function as the first of three segments or chapters. The roughly 20 combined works, however, would have made an equally beautiful stand-alone exhibition. The Paris-inspired paintings and drawings and several more. Pieces fill the central section of the exhibition space, which includes a wall that creates a small entrance foyer just inside the double-door entryway. On the wall facing the entrance hangs. It is nothing short of magnetic and literally radiates as the single piece of art that gives. A tender and timeless cohesion. In a strangely mystical way, the painting has been transformed, as if by some other-worldly alchemy. Ceases to be merely a romantic dream destination for an artist who is the embodiment of anomaly. Through the power of multidimensional transmutation, the painting becomes the bridge Gutiérrez grieved for when he learned of its demise, the doorway that carried him over the L. River from Boyle Heights to the center of the City of Angels, once upon a time. No longer content to span what is now just a cement-lined flood-control channel, the painting-as-park-cum-bridge has remolded and reshaped itself beyond the limits of causality and quantum physics. Guided by visionary arch-alchemist Roberto Gutiérrez, it now stretches from L. S Eastside to Midtown Manhattan, then leaps directly to Paris where it will stand guard over the River Seine at sunset, from here to eternity. Art of Marine veteran who paints as therapy on exhibit in Lincoln Heights. LOS ANGELES (KABC). Artist Roberto Gutierrez says color is in his DNA. He expresses that in his paintings, after having lived through the darkness of war. It’s my soother for PTSD. Still going through that, said Gutierrez. Never will get rid of it but it’s better. For more than 40 years, Gutierrez has been painting away the pain of the Vietnam War. Marine veteran is among just a few members of his platoon who made it home alive. Today, Gutierrez is a distinguished artist known for painting Los Angeles landscapes. His current exhibit at Plaza de la Raza also celebrates landscapes from New York and Paris. I got the bug for Paris when I started to be a young art student at East L. Junior College and I wanted to see those places Monet was at, and Manet, and then Picasso and Degas and all these guys. College is where he discovered art, and he’s been painting ever since. It is, in some ways, medicine for his post-traumatic stress disorder. “I continue to seek help, ” said Gutierrez. I’ve tried the kitchen sink. I’ve tried hypnosis. I’ve tried traditional therapy. I’ve tried Qigong. I’ve tried Tai Chi. Gabriel Jimenez, the curator at Plaza de la Raza, is especially fond of what this artist represents. “Resilience, person of color, instructor, teacher, mentor, history buff, ” said Jimenez. Chicano from this area showcasing the beauty of Los Angeles. This colorful exhibition runs through Feb. 16 at Plaza de la Raza in Lincoln Heights. The Cheech: A Tribute to Chicano Culture. This past summer, I had the privilege to visit The Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art and Culture; an experience that inspired an exploration of my identity and heritage. Despite my Chicana roots and love of the arts, I had never heard of this museum. My tia and prima were the ones that suggested going. Up until that point, I had only heard of studios or exhibitions dedicated to Chicano art, but never an entire museum. I immediately felt a sense of pride for the step forward in the battle for Chicano visibility and representation. On my ride to the museum, I was delved deep into my brain, searching for an answer to where I had heard “Cheech” before. I remembered the iconic duo Cheech and Chong and was stunned to learn that Cheech Marin was not only an actor and comedian, but an activist and major supporter of Chicano Arts. It turns out that he. Owns one of the most extensive collections of Chicano art in the world. Containing over 700 pieces of artwork. In fact, the Cheech was born from this very collection. From February 2 to May 7 of 2017, the Riverside Art Museum (RAM) held the exhibit. Papel Chicano Dos: Works on Paper. Containing a few of his collected works. It showcased 65 pieces from 24 Chicano artists. Admissions for the exhibit soared, nearly attracting 1,500 attendees, and greatly exceeding the normal amounts of admission revenue. The success of this exhibit exemplified the demand for Chicano art and opened the floor for a partnership between RAM, Riverside, and Cheech Marin. Cheech donated his collection to RAM. And just a couple years later, on. June 18th of 2022. The Cheech opened its doors to the public, occupying a small building just across from the renowned Mission Inn in Riverside’s historic district. This resulted in the beginning of its legacy as a pillar of and devotee to Chicano Arts. Together, we hope to bring every aspect of Chicano art to this region as well as the rest of the world. We have something wonderful to give. Immediately after entering the Cheech, I was amazed by the massive amounts of culture within. I flocked to all walls and corners of the building, taking my time with each piece of artwork in order to appreciate the beauty, community, and connection I felt with each. In my time covering all. I saw Chicano history in Vincent Valdez’ oil painting Kill the Pachuco Bastard! ” I witnessed past struggles and sorrows in Judithe Hernández’ “Juárez Quinceañera. I resonated with Alaniz Healy’s “Una tarde en Meoqui”, which painted the picture of a family, smiling and serving each other food. Whispers of representation and connection filled the quiet, pensive halls of the galleries. These were reinforced by remarks like That looks like your Tio Martin! While staring at works by César A. Martínez, and “Parece a la casa de tu abuela, ” referring to a painting by Jacinto Guevara. I, too, saw my family in the painted faces and locations. One of the first paintings we looked at was “City Terrace” by Roberto Gutiérrez. My tia pointed, Your Abuelito Jose used to live near there. My heart fluttered. I never had the chance to meet my abuelito, for he had passed before I was born. Somehow this painting gave him life, bringing me just a little closer to him, his experiences, and the history of my family. Representation matters, and The Cheech provides it for many Chicanos. It is an answer to the questions Who are the people of Los Angeles? What is their story? An answer that has long been ignored and hidden, many times forcefully so. The history and voices of the Chicano community have largely been pushed away from the American narrative, despite all the contributions that we have made. Chicano successes have been minimized and omitted from textbooks and other media for decades. This white-washed version of history has and continues to create generations of Mexican-Americans that have no knowledge of our people’s past victories and defeats, and no role-models, resulting in a lack of motivation to embrace our origins and culture. The Cheech is an important step to halting this erasure by weaving the story of Mexican-American people back into the public’s attention, creating a more complete look at the history of the United States, the very goal of Chicano art. According to the museum, Chicano art is the art of struggle, protest, and identity. ” The genre can trace its origins back to the Chicano Movement or “El Movimiento, in which artists used their work as a means of political and social advocacy. Chicano art then evolved to simply be a representation of their community, not necessarily focusing on any political aspects but instead reflecting on the story of the Mexican-American experience. It can be highly personal. But what I’ve learned over the years is that Chicano art reveals the sabor (flavor) of the community. The evolution of Chicano Art was exemplified perfectly through. The Cheech’s first temporary show, Collidoscope: de la Torre Brothers Retro-Perspective, which featured mixed-medium works, including lenticulars, glassblowing, and technological elements, by brothers Einar and Jamex de la Torre. Their centerpiece is a. 26 foot tall lenticular of the Aztec goddess Coatlicue. Who shifts into new form, incorporating various symbols of Chicano identity, as the viewing angle changes. On the second floor of the museum, the show. Included around 30 years of work. From the De La Torre Brothers. Born in Guadalajara and raised in the United States, integrated themes of pre-Columbian art, Catholic symbolism, and Mexican culture throughout their pieces, each reflecting the Latino experience within the American way of life. Each piece of artwork had so much to say and so much to offer beyond their gleaming aesthetics and beauty. One piece that stood out to me from this show was a mixed-media portrait titled “Soy Beaner”, which diplayed a range of Chicano as well as Eastern religious symbols, all within the structure of an Aztec Calendar. The symbols included flying Guadalupes, dragons, lizards, crabs, Mexican beer bottles, and much more. The description of the piece stated that it was meant to illustrate the fluidity of culture and identity. The title is not only a play on words, but it represents the reclaiming of a derogatory term as well as a jab at the fact that some traditional Mexican crafts are now mass produced in China and then consumed back in Mexico. Attending this museum, I felt submerged in a culture and identity that I have yet to fully explore. Unfortunately, I learned so much more about the history and experiences of Chicanos than I ever did in a classroom on this visit to The Cheech. This sad reality speaks to how fundamental The Cheech is to helping build a Chicano identity and repairing the damages done by those who have tried to bury it under white-washed records of the past. The success of The Cheech has shown us that the Mexican-American community is on its way to reclaiming our heritage and distinguishing ourselves as a people who have persevered through decades of discrimination. It is the gentle signifier that, despite derogatory remarks, accusations of being “murderers and rapists, ” and battles against direct and hostile racism, whether it be during the infamous Zoot Suit riots or current day, we matter. We have offered much to this country and will continue to do so. It is an exclamation against erasure, proving that history cannot cast us aside. The Cheech is an homage to the contributions of Chicano people, our losses, our wars, and our triumphs. It is an inspiring and thought-provoking experience, which I highly recommend to everyone, Chicano or not. Thank you Cheech Marin for this incredible sanctuary for dialogue surrounding the Chicano identity and the Mexican-American narrative. The Gritty Landscapes of Roberto Gutierrez. His paintings in this context are classic L. Noir, straight out of James Ellroy’s L. Confidential, and often rendered from photographs that are sometimes blurry and spotty, which is also incorporated into the painting to give it a more authentic feel. Roberto Gutierrez was born in 1943 in Los Angeles to a family at the edge of poverty and the youngest of nine children. They moved around a lot from Lincoln Heights, to Chinatown, to Highland Park, and then to Boyle Heights where he attended school at Roosevelt High. After graduating, with no job prospects and with inadequate internal turmoil for being an economic burden to his family, he volunteered to the U. Marine Corps and joined the Vietnam War. His time spent in boot camp was rewarding because at home he never had three meals a day, a bed with two sheets, a clean pillow and warm blanket, petty cash, but most importantly — his confidence multiplied. His mother and siblings weren’t of the warm idyllic stock that is often referenced in popular Latino culture, on the contrary, they were cruel and heartless and often tormented him, thus crushing his self-worth. It seemed he had found the answer in a strict military environment. And unlike many of his counterparts who went on to college and launched the intellectual framework of the Chicano Movement, Roberto was drawn to the conservative agenda learned in the service. But after six years of engaging in military conflict with the death toll increasing and closing in on him, he had a nervous breakdown after his father passed away back home and Roberto ended up at a naval hospital in San Francisco, and six months later, he was back in L. Where he would forever physically abandon the ravages of the battlefield. This period marked the return of the prodigal son, the spiritual return to his father even though he was physically removed. It was then that a new grasp on reality was needed. After several months of working a dead-end job and living without purpose, he used his G. Bill and enrolled in East Los Angeles Community College and was introduced to artists such as: Chaim Soutine, Monet, Van Gogh, Manet, Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, films like. The Battle of Algiers. The Souls of Black Folks, Nobody Knows My Name, Native Son. And the political culture of protest that surrounded him. Around this time he took up painting and began with the trauma experienced in Vietnam and the angst of his childhood as if reconciling the wrongs he had observed or were imposed on him. Mostly inspired by Soutine, Roberto Gutierrez went through a period where he experimented with painting rotting dead fish and chickens, and even a pig’s head, and although cathartic and necessary, it didn’t win him an audience. He had also started painting a self-portrait a year in the style of Basquiat, Schnable, and Anselm Kiefer, he sketched in notepads, address books, and folders reminiscent of Honore Daumier, but it wasn’t until he began painting impressionist and expressionist cityscapes, which professor Jose Orozco of Whittier College refers to as urban pastoralism, that people began to take notice. Mostly disillusioned, ignored, and losing hope because people were indifferent to the work he offered, he was encouraged in 1991 by Sister Karen at Self-Help Graphics to paint the cityscape barrios using watercolors and oil pastels to illustrate the colorful abstract skies, the dignity and vibrancy of the people amongst the landscapes, and the representational urban complexities expressed through cultural and civic pride. By the mid 2000’s, Roberto Gutierrez moved from colorful urban pastoralism to black and white landscapes often recalling an industrial-era feel and Kafkaesque nightmare of the barrios of Los Angeles that look like they could’ve been painted by a German expressionist or French impressionist, or a combination of both. The somber and monochromatic images represent a departure from the colorful and vibrant narratives that developed out of commonplace Chicano art, and as the artist views it, it is a way to recall the gritty texture of the cityscape that is supposed to represent concrete or cement as a direct contrast to glamorous undertones often promoted by boosters. Most of these paintings are devoid of people and are meant to produce a feeling of emptiness because they represent a Los Angeles that no longer exists. The lack of people metaphorically represents a generation of people that are also disappearing, people of his age, which is difficult for him to face. His new project is in collaboration with Studio 50 in Highland Park, a solo show with several works depicting the 6th street bridge that is set to be demolished because it has been declared faulty and unsafe to handle earthquakes. The 6th street bridge is one of the most iconic symbols of Los Angeles, but often neglected, abandoned, disdained, and ignored, but it stands over the concrete and decay of the L. River like a character out of Fritz Lang’s. Looking down on the populace with authoritative observance. Currently Roberto has several watercolor paintings and canvases that observe the bridge from different perspectives, and the one I was most astonished by was the one painted in black and white, with a dreary blue sky that is sobbing for the bridge that will no longer exist. I knew then that I was no longer looking at a painting of a bridge.
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE_Vintage_Chicano_Mexican_Art_Exhibition_Poster_Roberto_Gutierrez_SIGNED_01_jbjr

RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED

RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED

RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
This is a culturally important and Very RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, titled East Los Angeles, by esteemed Southern California Chicano artist Roberto Gutierrez b. This artwork depicts a bustling cityscape scene in East Los Angeles, with signs for Gage Ave. And Cesar Chavez Blvd. Visible in the distance. This artwork depicts a rain slicked road at sunset, with numerous vehicles passing through the center of the scene. Off to the sides, a paletero man, a small church service, and Latino families can be seen walking along the sidewalks. Hand signed and dated by the artist at the lower right edge: Roberto Gutierrez 95. Approximately 27 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches including frame. Actual visible artwork is approximately 19 1/4 x 27 1/4 inches. Good condition for age, with some light scuffing and paint loss to the original period frame please see photos. This particular variant of Gutierrez’ poster has never been offered for sale before, and when these pieces do come on the market, they are never hand signed by the artist. Original artworks by Roberto Gutierrez are prominently displayed in the permanent collections of the Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art and Culture of the Riverside Art Museum and held in many public and private art collections worldwide. Acquired in Los Angeles County, California. If you like what you see, I encourage you to make an Offer. Please check out my other listings for more wonderful and unique artworks! Chicano artist Roberto Gutiérrez is one of the most important artists to come out of the East Los Angeles artistic boom of the early 1970s. However, he has been largely ignored. This essay explores Gutiérrez’s life and the significance of his work to the evolving Chicana/o artistic narrative about Latino life and aesthetics in Los Angeles. In particular, it explores the way in which Gutiérrez’s oeuvre reflects and creates an image of urban Los Angeles that is distinctly Latino and working-class. The Avenue Studio proudly presents Roberto Gutierrez – Paintings. Roberto Gutierrez, painting for over 30 years, is one of the more important artists to come out of East Los Angeles. His inspiration comes from the gritty streets where daily he walks, and the coffee houses and bookstores he frequents. Roberto sketches incessantly all he observes which later becomes an acrylic or gouache painting. This current body of work exhibited represents a small but significant cross-section of Gutierrez’s historical record, including his Paris series. His work has been widely shown in galleries throughout the Southwest. Many of his paintings have been the possession of former Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Roberto Gutiérrez: Vietnam Veteran, Chicano Artist Capturing the Colors of Life. His life’s journey — walking through the bloodied soils of Vietnam, through the halls of East Los Angeles College, up and down the marbled floors of the finest museums in Europe, and retracing the steps of his artistic heroes in Montmartre, France – all have influenced him to become the renown painter he is today: incapsulating landmarks, streets. Everyday people, capturing imagery of colors and shapes that transition from realism to impressionism to abstract. Roberto Gutiérrez left Los Angeles in 1961 as a naïve 17-year old figuring the U. Marines was a great way to escape his difficult childhood. And, he guessed, it was a way to get an education and improve his future potential – at what? Well, here he was clueless. Robert “Bob” Gutiérrez, U. Marine Corps, having served and survived the horrors of Vietnam without ever discovering what he would do for the rest of his life. Thankfully, Gutiérrez did eventually find his life calling. Today, Chicano Studies scholars rate him as one of the most important Chicano artists to come out of the Los Angeles 1970s’ boom. Gutiérrez, now 73, is the first to admit that he is an emotional painter. It could be a traumatic childhood or Vietnam memory that might dictate if he uses thick black paint with wide abstract strokes, like the ones he used for his recent 6th Street Bridge collection. The bold black represents the great sadness that this iconic L. Landmark that connected the east to west has a date with a wrecking ball. “This bridge was a big deal back when Los Angeles was a younger city, ” recalled Gutiérrez. He walked across it dozens of times from childhood to the present. Witnessing the bridge as a newbie to now seeing it’s demise, breaks my heart. This collection represents the metaphor for life. You’re born, you go through life and then you die. That’s how this collection’s images came to life. There are also paintings that represent more playful emotions, street scenes filled with color and images of his gente (people), living mundane days with unshakable faith and hope-images associated with a Latino community. Gutiérrez’s work has evolved from looking more like photographs to instead challenging his imagination by capturing the strong feelings rather than the literal image. And then there is his breathtaking 2013 Paris collection. Images seize the positive of our neighborhoods and landscapes, his Paris collection morphs the spirits of painters: figurative impressionist Édouard Manet, post-impressionist Vincent van Gogh, landscape impressionist Claude Monet and expressionist Chaim Soutine. “Paris does something to me, ” Gutiérrez said. When I see a particular sight in Paris, I just run with it. I run with my feelings. One painting may look like an impressionist painting and another one may impress me differently and remind me of Soutine, whose paintings depending on his mood may look a little like he might have been on acid when he painted it. I just go with it. Paris brought out the best of my figurative impressionist paintings. But as I’ve gotten older, I’ve evolved more into abstract images. “I believe my new European collection will be more abstract, but we’ll see what comes out of me, ” Gutiérrez said. I may start it one way but the ultimate result is unknown to me until I’m done. That’s what painting with your emotions does to you. I’m very excited to be returning to Paris. Eating at one of his favorite Italian restaurants recently, he was asked if he had retired. “There is no such thing as retirement for poor people, ” he chuckled with the same youthful sparkle in his eyes. Gutiérrez continues to paint and teach a mixed-media art class at Plaza de La Raza in Lincoln Heights. Gutiérrez is currently also part of the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) new exhibition “Somewhere Over El Arco Iris: Chicano Landscapes, 1971 to 2015, ” which runs through Nov. MOLAA is open Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 11 a. M to 5 p. Friday from 11 a. Admission is free only on Sunday. This Veterans Day, Lance Cpl. Robert “Bob” Gutiérrez will pay tribute to several memorial ceremonies throughout the city of Los Angeles. But he will never, ever discuss his Vietnam experience – these emotions are revealed only in his paintings. Yet you know it is important because the few hanging photos in his home are of his buddies, many whom never made it back. Roberto Gutiérrez: The Alchemy of Magical Brushstrokes and Metropolitan Landscapes. Artist and studio painter Roberto Gutiérrez isn’t pulling any punches these days. In fact, it wouldn’t be an overstatement to say the native son of L. S Eastside is coming up aces more often than not. And when he isn’t walking away from his latest self-imposed challenge with a resounding victory, he’s holding his own with a combination of skill, panache and charisma that forces a split decision in his favor. And with the title belt all but his, he’s primed and ready to face off once more with a few of the most important metropolitan centers in the world. Increasingly revered as master of the urban landscape-rich and distinctly enunciated personal panoramas from “el mundo Gutierrezano”(the Gutierrezian world)-he remains an artist beyond the pale. A recent solo exhibition at the edge of a small, unlikely lake in the Los Angeles Lincoln Heights district is the most emphatic affirmation yet of a simple, unspoken truth: Roberto Gutiérrez is the most important Chicano artist you’ve never heard of. And that isn’t his problem. It isn’t my problem. Roberto Gutiérrez: The Evolution of a Contemporary Artist-Magical Brushstrokes of Metropolitan Landscapes. The spry, paintbrush and graphite-wielding septuagenarian waltzes out of the hometown corner with welterweight grace. Reared in the somewhat hard-knock but still irrepressibly noble barrios of Los Angeles, he offers up, as an unblemished score card, the record of his date with the foremost metropolis in the nation. The unanimously riveting visual diary-worthy of a Madison Square Garden spectacle-brims with the streets, the pedestrian pathways, the built environments and the natural landscapes of Manhattan. Deftly curated by Gabriel Jiménez at the Plaza de la Raza Boathouse Gallery in Lincoln Park, the selection of paintings and works on paper-inspired by the Eastside enclaves he came of age in, his twin pilgrimages to Paris, L. S late Sixth Street Bridge, and, ultimately, even Gotham itself-bristle with big-city light and luster. They also echo and twist with the indelible love and loss that make borders, city limits and nation-state boundaries meaningless. Rendered by the artist in acrylic on canvas, graphite on paper or with various ink, gouache, and tie-dye combinations, the factories, museums and office towers we recognize from a familiar Manhattan skyline hum and resonate as much with the humanity of the crowds passing through them daily as they do with historical or architectural significance. Executed over the last three years, the results of his affair with Hong Kong on the Hudson are a fitting finale to the three-part survey of a career that merits serious study and examination. (Gouache, Sumi Ink and Tie-dye) and. Central Park in the Winter. (Acrylic on Canvas) are no more or no less sacred than the. (Sumi Ink and Tie-dye) or a. Water Tower in Manhattan. (Sumi Ink and Tie-dye). From the serenity of a snow-riddled Central Park scene to the obscure beauty of. Little Brazil & 46th Street. What becomes most clear in the crowning segment of this highly anticipated evolutionary assessment-is that Gutiérrez, the artist, is at home anywhere. “Of course I was always Chicano, but before any of that, I was just another one of those [Mexican] street urchins, ” Gutiérrez says. As a kid, I used to walk downtown to shine shoes, and I thought I’d hit the big time when I could charge ten cents instead of a nickel. If hunger and hardship at home shaped his childhood during the 1940s and’50s in Chinatown, Boyle Heights and East L. Combat in Vietnam as a U. Marine reinforced the futility of dreams and aspirations. Enlisting at 17, he was guaranteed “three squares a day” and found purpose in the regimen of military routine. That illusion evaporated, he confesses, during a mental breakdown leading to his discharge. “When I got out of the military, I took a drawing class at East LA College, and realized I couldn’t draw, ” he says. Turning to abstract art, he nonetheless favored, he recounts, the “Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and Fauvists” until he was confronted, berated and cajoled by legendary Self Help Graphics founder Sister Karen Boccalero. “She insisted I make figurative work, ” Gutiérrez recalls. And she encouraged me to come home in my art. Was scheduled to close in January but extended to accommodate more gallery traffic than usual. According to Brenda Herrera, principal at a PR firm representing him, Gutiérrez taught art at Plaza de la Raza for over 20-years. “He retired two years ago, but everybody remembers him, ” Herrera says. With curatorial authenticity derived from a familiarity with and the inclusion of several important early works, the exhibition is pays heed to the artist’s deliberate use, during that formative period, of heavy lines and a slightly skewed perspective. The dark outlining of both human figures and inanimate subjects imbues them with a playful defiance. (Acrylic on Canvas), centered on a Little Tokyo landmark, the storefronts, asphalt and pavement are living, breathing repositories of a community’s history and heart. Their innate cultural validity-agency, alluded to in the saturated color, opposes erasure or relegation to phantom invisibility. Paintings such as C. Ity Terrace, Eagle Street and City Terrace Drive. Provide a similar refrain, albeit in less commercial, primarily residential corridors of historic East L. These earlier works, foreshadow the more painterly concerns evident in the second suite of works installed in the middle section of the gallery. Gestated during a pair of trips to the French capital, two pieces here. (Acrylic on Canvas) and. Last Light Ile de la Cite. (Black & White) evoke a style I’ve described elsewhere as architectural abstractionism. ” Both depict austere and haunting spaces in working-class Parisian “arrondissements. There, Gutiérrez retraced the Montemarte meanderings of Van Gogh, Cezanne and Gaugin, artists who broke from Impressionism and rejected schools of impersonal realism or representational. In this context, it is worth noting that a number of the Paris-inspired works feature old-world architectural elements-windows, street lamps and staircases-that verge on form-based abstraction but nonetheless invoke emotional depth and vulnerability. Wild Ride on 6th Street Bridge. (Acrylic on Canvas) delivers an intensely visceral flood of foreboding, despite a limited palette. While ostensibly figurative, the painting seems intentionally fraught with a dangerously irreverent eagerness to dance lasciviously with a less than latent abstract expressionism. The subject of the painting, a car careening out of control atop the bridge, is symbolic. One false note, a single misstep, an unintended line or an accidental brushstroke from the hand responsible for. Is all that this recalcitrant abstraction needs to send the car over the edge, usurp the narrative and subvert the otherwise civilized Gutiérrez send off in honor the iconic bridge he was sorry to see destroyed. By contrast, series of smaller gray-scale paintings depicting concrete and steel bridge details from the demolished steel girder structure-intentionally hung in an abstract pyramid pattern-is collectively rife with a forlorn sadness that coexists with each painting’s geometrically abstract, detached reference to the lost viaduct. Culled from a specific series called. Elegy to the 6th Street Bridge. Which debuted at Ave. 50 Studios, Gutiérrez says, they were the result out of a dark pall that descended upon him after a return from the second excursion to Paris and the successful opening of a likewise gray-tinted collection inspired by the 1930s and’40s noir legacy in Los Angeles. I felt like it was time to come home. I was ready, Gutiérrez says, referring to the genesis of the aforementioned exhibition of work based on L. That was really how the. The wrecking ball that not long ago annihilated the bridge which had loomed so heavily over his past and in his imagination was simply a reminder that even monumental cement and steel wonders, like celluloid archives, are ephemeral vanities at best. For Gutiérrez, who has courageously painted his way through murkier and bloodier terrain before, there remained one more distant prize on the horizon, one that harkened back to his boyhood walks along Broadway at the height of an era when movie palaces-the Million Dollar Theater and The Orpheum, for example-glittered nightly with neon. First run films, red carpet premieres and Hollywood stars were frequent fixtures in and around L. S original Broadway Theater District then. Because it was Broadway, you automatically thought of New York. Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, says Gutiérrez. He credits Gabriel Jiménez and Plaza de la Raza Executive Director María Jiménez for their belief in the viability of an exhibition based on the evolution of his work over time. His late bloomer travel opportunities, he exclaims, have all been dreams come true. “Everyone was getting ready for Christmas, ” he says about his inevitable beeline to the oft-cited center of the art world. We rode around Central Park in a horse-drawn carriage. So, yes, I feel very lucky, says Gutiérrez. His genuine excitement and joy are effusive. They are occasioned by the tangible reflection of his aesthetic trajectory over the last several decades gathered in a formidable retrospective. Grouped together as one “suite” in a semi-enclosed space to the immediate left of the gallery entrance, the East L. Landscapes and a few of the bridge works function as the first of three segments or chapters. The roughly 20 combined works, however, would have made an equally beautiful stand-alone exhibition. The Paris-inspired paintings and drawings and several more. Pieces fill the central section of the exhibition space, which includes a wall that creates a small entrance foyer just inside the double-door entryway. On the wall facing the entrance hangs. It is nothing short of magnetic and literally radiates as the single piece of art that gives. A tender and timeless cohesion. In a strangely mystical way, the painting has been transformed, as if by some other-worldly alchemy. Ceases to be merely a romantic dream destination for an artist who is the embodiment of anomaly. Through the power of multidimensional transmutation, the painting becomes the bridge Gutiérrez grieved for when he learned of its demise, the doorway that carried him over the L. River from Boyle Heights to the center of the City of Angels, once upon a time. No longer content to span what is now just a cement-lined flood-control channel, the painting-as-park-cum-bridge has remolded and reshaped itself beyond the limits of causality and quantum physics. Guided by visionary arch-alchemist Roberto Gutiérrez, it now stretches from L. S Eastside to Midtown Manhattan, then leaps directly to Paris where it will stand guard over the River Seine at sunset, from here to eternity. Art of Marine veteran who paints as therapy on exhibit in Lincoln Heights. LOS ANGELES (KABC). Artist Roberto Gutierrez says color is in his DNA. He expresses that in his paintings, after having lived through the darkness of war. It’s my soother for PTSD. Still going through that, said Gutierrez. Never will get rid of it but it’s better. For more than 40 years, Gutierrez has been painting away the pain of the Vietnam War. Marine veteran is among just a few members of his platoon who made it home alive. Today, Gutierrez is a distinguished artist known for painting Los Angeles landscapes. His current exhibit at Plaza de la Raza also celebrates landscapes from New York and Paris. I got the bug for Paris when I started to be a young art student at East L. Junior College and I wanted to see those places Monet was at, and Manet, and then Picasso and Degas and all these guys. College is where he discovered art, and he’s been painting ever since. It is, in some ways, medicine for his post-traumatic stress disorder. “I continue to seek help, ” said Gutierrez. I’ve tried the kitchen sink. I’ve tried hypnosis. I’ve tried traditional therapy. I’ve tried Qigong. I’ve tried Tai Chi. Gabriel Jimenez, the curator at Plaza de la Raza, is especially fond of what this artist represents. “Resilience, person of color, instructor, teacher, mentor, history buff, ” said Jimenez. Chicano from this area showcasing the beauty of Los Angeles. This colorful exhibition runs through Feb. 16 at Plaza de la Raza in Lincoln Heights. The Cheech: A Tribute to Chicano Culture. This past summer, I had the privilege to visit The Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art and Culture; an experience that inspired an exploration of my identity and heritage. Despite my Chicana roots and love of the arts, I had never heard of this museum. My tia and prima were the ones that suggested going. Up until that point, I had only heard of studios or exhibitions dedicated to Chicano art, but never an entire museum. I immediately felt a sense of pride for the step forward in the battle for Chicano visibility and representation. On my ride to the museum, I was delved deep into my brain, searching for an answer to where I had heard “Cheech” before. I remembered the iconic duo Cheech and Chong and was stunned to learn that Cheech Marin was not only an actor and comedian, but an activist and major supporter of Chicano Arts. It turns out that he. Owns one of the most extensive collections of Chicano art in the world. Containing over 700 pieces of artwork. In fact, the Cheech was born from this very collection. From February 2 to May 7 of 2017, the Riverside Art Museum (RAM) held the exhibit. Papel Chicano Dos: Works on Paper. Containing a few of his collected works. It showcased 65 pieces from 24 Chicano artists. Admissions for the exhibit soared, nearly attracting 1,500 attendees, and greatly exceeding the normal amounts of admission revenue. The success of this exhibit exemplified the demand for Chicano art and opened the floor for a partnership between RAM, Riverside, and Cheech Marin. Cheech donated his collection to RAM. And just a couple years later, on. June 18th of 2022. The Cheech opened its doors to the public, occupying a small building just across from the renowned Mission Inn in Riverside’s historic district. This resulted in the beginning of its legacy as a pillar of and devotee to Chicano Arts. Together, we hope to bring every aspect of Chicano art to this region as well as the rest of the world. We have something wonderful to give. Immediately after entering the Cheech, I was amazed by the massive amounts of culture within. I flocked to all walls and corners of the building, taking my time with each piece of artwork in order to appreciate the beauty, community, and connection I felt with each. In my time covering all. I saw Chicano history in Vincent Valdez’ oil painting Kill the Pachuco Bastard! ” I witnessed past struggles and sorrows in Judithe Hernández’ “Juárez Quinceañera. I resonated with Alaniz Healy’s “Una tarde en Meoqui”, which painted the picture of a family, smiling and serving each other food. Whispers of representation and connection filled the quiet, pensive halls of the galleries. These were reinforced by remarks like That looks like your Tio Martin! While staring at works by César A. Martínez, and “Parece a la casa de tu abuela, ” referring to a painting by Jacinto Guevara. I, too, saw my family in the painted faces and locations. One of the first paintings we looked at was “City Terrace” by Roberto Gutiérrez. My tia pointed, Your Abuelito Jose used to live near there. My heart fluttered. I never had the chance to meet my abuelito, for he had passed before I was born. Somehow this painting gave him life, bringing me just a little closer to him, his experiences, and the history of my family. Representation matters, and The Cheech provides it for many Chicanos. It is an answer to the questions Who are the people of Los Angeles? What is their story? An answer that has long been ignored and hidden, many times forcefully so. The history and voices of the Chicano community have largely been pushed away from the American narrative, despite all the contributions that we have made. Chicano successes have been minimized and omitted from textbooks and other media for decades. This white-washed version of history has and continues to create generations of Mexican-Americans that have no knowledge of our people’s past victories and defeats, and no role-models, resulting in a lack of motivation to embrace our origins and culture. The Cheech is an important step to halting this erasure by weaving the story of Mexican-American people back into the public’s attention, creating a more complete look at the history of the United States, the very goal of Chicano art. According to the museum, Chicano art is the art of struggle, protest, and identity. ” The genre can trace its origins back to the Chicano Movement or “El Movimiento, in which artists used their work as a means of political and social advocacy. Chicano art then evolved to simply be a representation of their community, not necessarily focusing on any political aspects but instead reflecting on the story of the Mexican-American experience. It can be highly personal. But what I’ve learned over the years is that Chicano art reveals the sabor (flavor) of the community. The evolution of Chicano Art was exemplified perfectly through. The Cheech’s first temporary show, Collidoscope: de la Torre Brothers Retro-Perspective, which featured mixed-medium works, including lenticulars, glassblowing, and technological elements, by brothers Einar and Jamex de la Torre. Their centerpiece is a. 26 foot tall lenticular of the Aztec goddess Coatlicue. Who shifts into new form, incorporating various symbols of Chicano identity, as the viewing angle changes. On the second floor of the museum, the show. Included around 30 years of work. From the De La Torre Brothers. Born in Guadalajara and raised in the United States, integrated themes of pre-Columbian art, Catholic symbolism, and Mexican culture throughout their pieces, each reflecting the Latino experience within the American way of life. Each piece of artwork had so much to say and so much to offer beyond their gleaming aesthetics and beauty. One piece that stood out to me from this show was a mixed-media portrait titled “Soy Beaner”, which diplayed a range of Chicano as well as Eastern religious symbols, all within the structure of an Aztec Calendar. The symbols included flying Guadalupes, dragons, lizards, crabs, Mexican beer bottles, and much more. The description of the piece stated that it was meant to illustrate the fluidity of culture and identity. The title is not only a play on words, but it represents the reclaiming of a derogatory term as well as a jab at the fact that some traditional Mexican crafts are now mass produced in China and then consumed back in Mexico. Attending this museum, I felt submerged in a culture and identity that I have yet to fully explore. Unfortunately, I learned so much more about the history and experiences of Chicanos than I ever did in a classroom on this visit to The Cheech. This sad reality speaks to how fundamental The Cheech is to helping build a Chicano identity and repairing the damages done by those who have tried to bury it under white-washed records of the past. The success of The Cheech has shown us that the Mexican-American community is on its way to reclaiming our heritage and distinguishing ourselves as a people who have persevered through decades of discrimination. It is the gentle signifier that, despite derogatory remarks, accusations of being “murderers and rapists, ” and battles against direct and hostile racism, whether it be during the infamous Zoot Suit riots or current day, we matter. We have offered much to this country and will continue to do so. It is an exclamation against erasure, proving that history cannot cast us aside. The Cheech is an homage to the contributions of Chicano people, our losses, our wars, and our triumphs. It is an inspiring and thought-provoking experience, which I highly recommend to everyone, Chicano or not. Thank you Cheech Marin for this incredible sanctuary for dialogue surrounding the Chicano identity and the Mexican-American narrative. The Gritty Landscapes of Roberto Gutierrez. His paintings in this context are classic L. Noir, straight out of James Ellroy’s L. Confidential, and often rendered from photographs that are sometimes blurry and spotty, which is also incorporated into the painting to give it a more authentic feel. Roberto Gutierrez was born in 1943 in Los Angeles to a family at the edge of poverty and the youngest of nine children. They moved around a lot from Lincoln Heights, to Chinatown, to Highland Park, and then to Boyle Heights where he attended school at Roosevelt High. After graduating, with no job prospects and with inadequate internal turmoil for being an economic burden to his family, he volunteered to the U. Marine Corps and joined the Vietnam War. His time spent in boot camp was rewarding because at home he never had three meals a day, a bed with two sheets, a clean pillow and warm blanket, petty cash, but most importantly — his confidence multiplied. His mother and siblings weren’t of the warm idyllic stock that is often referenced in popular Latino culture, on the contrary, they were cruel and heartless and often tormented him, thus crushing his self-worth. It seemed he had found the answer in a strict military environment. And unlike many of his counterparts who went on to college and launched the intellectual framework of the Chicano Movement, Roberto was drawn to the conservative agenda learned in the service. But after six years of engaging in military conflict with the death toll increasing and closing in on him, he had a nervous breakdown after his father passed away back home and Roberto ended up at a naval hospital in San Francisco, and six months later, he was back in L. Where he would forever physically abandon the ravages of the battlefield. This period marked the return of the prodigal son, the spiritual return to his father even though he was physically removed. It was then that a new grasp on reality was needed. After several months of working a dead-end job and living without purpose, he used his G. Bill and enrolled in East Los Angeles Community College and was introduced to artists such as: Chaim Soutine, Monet, Van Gogh, Manet, Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, films like. The Battle of Algiers. The Souls of Black Folks, Nobody Knows My Name, Native Son. And the political culture of protest that surrounded him. Around this time he took up painting and began with the trauma experienced in Vietnam and the angst of his childhood as if reconciling the wrongs he had observed or were imposed on him. Mostly inspired by Soutine, Roberto Gutierrez went through a period where he experimented with painting rotting dead fish and chickens, and even a pig’s head, and although cathartic and necessary, it didn’t win him an audience. He had also started painting a self-portrait a year in the style of Basquiat, Schnable, and Anselm Kiefer, he sketched in notepads, address books, and folders reminiscent of Honore Daumier, but it wasn’t until he began painting impressionist and expressionist cityscapes, which professor Jose Orozco of Whittier College refers to as urban pastoralism, that people began to take notice. Mostly disillusioned, ignored, and losing hope because people were indifferent to the work he offered, he was encouraged in 1991 by Sister Karen at Self-Help Graphics to paint the cityscape barrios using watercolors and oil pastels to illustrate the colorful abstract skies, the dignity and vibrancy of the people amongst the landscapes, and the representational urban complexities expressed through cultural and civic pride. By the mid 2000’s, Roberto Gutierrez moved from colorful urban pastoralism to black and white landscapes often recalling an industrial-era feel and Kafkaesque nightmare of the barrios of Los Angeles that look like they could’ve been painted by a German expressionist or French impressionist, or a combination of both. The somber and monochromatic images represent a departure from the colorful and vibrant narratives that developed out of commonplace Chicano art, and as the artist views it, it is a way to recall the gritty texture of the cityscape that is supposed to represent concrete or cement as a direct contrast to glamorous undertones often promoted by boosters. Most of these paintings are devoid of people and are meant to produce a feeling of emptiness because they represent a Los Angeles that no longer exists. The lack of people metaphorically represents a generation of people that are also disappearing, people of his age, which is difficult for him to face. His new project is in collaboration with Studio 50 in Highland Park, a solo show with several works depicting the 6th street bridge that is set to be demolished because it has been declared faulty and unsafe to handle earthquakes. The 6th street bridge is one of the most iconic symbols of Los Angeles, but often neglected, abandoned, disdained, and ignored, but it stands over the concrete and decay of the L. River like a character out of Fritz Lang’s. Looking down on the populace with authoritative observance. Currently Roberto has several watercolor paintings and canvases that observe the bridge from different perspectives, and the one I was most astonished by was the one painted in black and white, with a dreary blue sky that is sobbing for the bridge that will no longer exist. I knew then that I was no longer looking at a painting of a bridge.
RARE Vintage Chicano Mexican Art Exhibition Poster, Roberto Gutierrez SIGNED
1986_Rene_Lalique_Los_Angeles_County_Musuem_Of_Art_Exhibit_Poster_01_hd

1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster

1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster

1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster. This is a true original poster of his famous Peacock Corsage Ornament. The poster is in great original condition and has been framed in a hand made custom frame. I do not know if it is matted or not to the back. The frame is in nice condition and the work is ready to be displayed. Of all the animals reproduced in the work of Lalique, the peacock is perhaps regarded as the most emblematic of the spirit of Art Nouveau, and it is a recurring theme in the artist’s work, whether isolated as here or in pairs in other jewels. This pectoral is made up of an enormous, articulated peacock in enamelled gold in tones of blue and green simulating the feathers of the bird which have small cabochon-oval opals set here and there. Sinuous movement of the feathers in the tail, turned to the left, is enriched by a balanced composition of diamonds, of various sizes, that finish off the piece on both sides. Please see the photos for more details. Measures 20 x 33.
1986 Rene Lalique Los Angeles County Musuem Of Art Exhibit Poster